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Global Investors Podcast
GI131: Developing Over 5 Million Square Feet of Real Estate with Ari Rastegar
December 23, 2021
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GI131: Developing Over 5 Million Square Feet of Real Estate with Ari Rastegar

Ari Rastegar is the CEO and founder of Rastegar Property Company LLC located in Austin, Texas. Before starting the company, he was a successful real estate investor and lawyer. Despite the economic depression that has been caused by the covid-19 pandemic, Ari has been able to close more than 11 major commercial deals. This is perhaps because his firm mainly purchases recession resilient assets.

In the podcast, Charles and Ari discuss the latter’s life experiences and background. He also highlights how he got into the real estate development sector, and how he managed to remain afloat therein. Ari and Charles also discuss the prevailing economic environment, bearing in mind the recession that has been caused by the pandemic. The duo also discusses several real estate development projects that Ari’s company is pursuing presently.

While discussing the economy, Ari points out that it is approaching an inflationary environment. However, while this is a fact, Ari believes that the effects of the inflationary environment, like Mark Twain’s death, have been exaggerated. Despite the challenges that have been forecasted, Ari reassures his clients that his company remains true to its core principles, which is not to lose money. They also discuss some of the mistakes people in the real estate development sector make. In response to the question, Ari points out that it is difficult to pinpoint a mistake in the sector. He notes that he has seen people make decisions that appear to be stupid then later see them succeed based on those ideas. However, from a holistic perspective, Ari thinks that the biggest mistake investors and entrepreneurs in the real estate development sector make is operating from a point of self-interest.

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Transcript:

Announcer:
Welcome to the Global Investors Podcast, a show that focuses on helping foreign investors enter the lucrative US real estate market. Host, Charles Carillo, combined decades of real estate investing experience with a professional background in international banking to interview experts in all areas of US real estate investing. Now here’s your host, Charles Carillo.

Charles:
Welcome to another episode of the Global Investors Podcast; I’m your host Charles Carillo. Today we have Ari Rastegar. Ari began his work in real estate investing in 2006 while still in law school and today his real estate investments span 38 cities across 13 states, and include vintage multifamily units, mixed-use complexes, storage facilities and more. He was called the Oracle of Austin by Forbes and has just been inducted, I believe the youngest person into the power 100 for 2021. So thank you so much for being on the show, Ari.

Ari:
Hey, thanks for having me.

Charles:
So give us a little bit on your background prior professionally and personally before into your current real estate investing and developing.

Ari:
Yeah. Absolutely. You know, I, I kind of, you know, people kind of bifurcate their personal and their business lives together and you know, what I do in my business life is really who I am more so than what I do, if that makes sense. Yeah. So it was very much a marriage between between those worlds and, you know, it goes from having my name on the door, which was something that my grandfather, you know, wanted my dad. And it was an Iranian immigrant after the Iranian revolution. And you know, they, you know, kind of had to rebuild and which has been the plight and the story of a lot of Iranian Americans that came here. So they really killed, you know, my, you know, our whole family on, on that side, on that side. And, and again, our story isn’t unique in that regard, but I’m very fortunate to be born and raised in Austin, Texas.

Ari:
I’m an attorney by trade. A lot of people don’t know that I was actually an English major in undergrad. But with that said, I had to go to two community colleges before I got into Texas a and M because I was not exactly a great high school student to say the least little bit of a, a little bit of a revels to put it lightly. But then I, I spent some time in Mexican ago doing a study abroad, I speak, you know, several languages fluently and one of them being Spanish and varsity and, you know, I always just was really enamored by beautiful buildings and being an English major, you kind of, and an attorney, you read a lot. And I still, you know, very, very much of a big reader. Both my parents are big readers.

Ari:
My mother is German descent. So, and my wife is half Guatemala and half Spanish. We have three beautiful kids, so our kids were kinda like the United nations that I always kind of joke about. You know, so it it’s very much, although we are a very institutional firm with public pension funds, family offices, as our bulk of our investors, high net worth individuals. Some of the biggest entertainers athletes in the world are all our investors that are my dearest friends. You know, there’s this blending of that, of those worlds that we’ve put together that really has a human element to it, of knowing these folks, understanding our vendors, knowing our vendors, creating a better, you know, user experience, but it came from a, from a dream from my grandpa. You know, he tell me, and I know it’s a little bit cliche, but he stayed in farse of, you know, they’re not making any more land, you know, they’re not making any more of this stuff.

Ari:
And he was a doctor and a psychiatrist by trade, and I wanted to kind of do what he did, my dad’s an attorney. And so he kind of, you know not UN forcefully told me that I had to become an attorney and do basically do whatever the hell I wanted. So yeah, so I mean, I, you know, look I’ve heard people say that I came from nothing and that’s just kind of not true, you know, being born in America, you know, having, you know, two parents, my parents divorced when I was really young, but you know, both, you know, highly intelligent, both big readers being to health and wellness. And it’s kind of made me kind of who I am, but I, you know, flip burgers at Johnny rockets when I was in UN when I was in high school and delivered pizzas through college.

Ari:
And decided when I was in law school, had this hair brain idea to borrow 3000 bucks from, you know to start buying little, lots and partnering with a big developer north of San Antonio. And I was on the build side at four or five in the morning, you know, doing, doing all the, doing all the work, you know, whether from pouring concrete to sheet rock, to electrical, to roofing. So, and that wasn’t exactly my forte. You, you know, per se, but but we started doing these one, you know, little houses, like $80,000 loan, interim construction loan selling ’em for 115 grand back in 2005, six, as you mentioned, and correlated into something pretty substantial. And then 2008 hit, and, you know, luckily I had a great partner and he had the liquidity and he saw the work that we had done.

Ari:
So on paper, it looked pretty, looked pretty sexy, you know, in oh seven. But I kind of got out of it with with my hat and credit paying back the money that I owed and went to wolfs street and worked for some of the greatest minds in the world because my wrestling coach ironically enough, and I wasn’t that good of a wrestler might research the imagination. But my wrestling coach’s cousin was the head of credit Sue’s conduit lending business. And he gave me my shot. And we’re still you actually, we were on the phone last night for an hour and a half. His oldest son works for me. Stayed very, very close and, you know, around, you know, 2015, I kind of had the itch to that it’s can be done in a better way, wanted to come home to Austin.

Ari:
You know, we saw the writing on the wall, maybe that’s why Forbes said the Oracle thing, but to me it was math. I’ve always been able to do the math in my head, you know, so I wanted to really focus on the philosophy and the beta trade and the macro trade and what the city was gonna become and a city to, I love. And we started off investing with great operators that I had met over the years, working on wall street and, you know, had, you know, a lot of, a lot of investors that kind of knew that I was, you know, doing the work, if that makes sense. Yeah. And had the blessings from my boss who now are my investors also. And so there was no, they didn’t hold me back. In fact, they said, Hey, you know, go for it.

Ari:
We’ll invest with you. Any of the investors that are with us that wanna invest with you were cool with that. And I just kind of Cod or LP capital, or I lent money. I just played all the capital stack to mitigate risk. And when I felt comfortable with the model, we built our own property management company. We started buying smaller apartment complexes, renovating them, owning the whole spectrum from the construction side all the way through property management, all the way through PE and acquisitions, and then built a horizontally and vertically integrated estate platform across all asset classes. So we are building over 4,000 houses in Austin, in Austin MSA. We have condos going up in Phoenix condos on south first, we have three and a half million square feet industrial program that we’re breaking ground on phase one and the opportunity zone in Austin, in office building in.

Ari:
And that’s not all of it, so wow. You know, and so that’s that’s long and short. I have three beautiful children that, you know, when you get really tired and you kind of want to quit, which we all kind of get to that place when you’re going after something big, you know, you think of them and the life that you wanna create for them. And I’ve always had a why, you know, that’s not about me about creating a better experience about taking care of our investors in a more human way than I’d, I’d really seen. And maybe that’s a liberal arts side of me, that heart value that we, that we bring to the table, but, you know, don’t let anybody kid you, or as much a data analytics, artificial intelligence, backbone. Yeah. And that’s, and that’s, that’s kind of it, you know, really, really in a nutshell, but I love what I do.

Ari:
My day job is risk management. You know, I manage risk for a living, you know, and manage, you know, what all the scenarios are that we can lose money, cuz we’re not the folks that swing for the fences. We’re the folks that, you know, do everything in our power just to not lose money. You know, it’s, it’s always been my philosophy. It’s just try not to lose money and I’m not a magician. Maybe I’m an Oracle, but I’m not a magician. Right. You know, like I, I don’t even know what that means, but you know, it that’s always been, the philosophy is capital preservation, hitting singles and doubles, let that grow every now and then you hit something big and just work harder than anybody could ever expect physiologically psychologically or humanistically than anybody. Yeah. And that’s always been my philosophy.

Charles:
Nice. So I, I was reading this before about the singles and doubles because I’m a firm believer in that as well. Can you explain a little bit more about, about how that is and where we are now in our, in our, in our portion of the market cycle, how does that ring true for you? And why is that so important that you know, you’re not swinging for the fence on everything you’re, you’re just swinging for solid deals consistently.

Ari:
Yeah, no it’s and, and the answer is, is actually pretty, is pretty simple. Look right now, we’re going into an inflationary environment. Mm-Hmm <affirmative> that has been you know, mark Twain has a funny quote. He said, the rumors of my death have been greatly exaggerated, you know? And, and so I use that only to say that the rumors of inflation and know being this dramatic kind of thing, that’s just not what the math says. Are we gonna have an inflationary environment to some degree? Yes. But you, when you study history and again, Twain being liberal arts, he said, you know, history doesn’t repeat itself, but it sure does. You know, so we know we’re going into an inflationary environment and traditionalists investment philosophy is when you go into an inflationary environment, you invest in hard assets, whether that’s gold, whether that’s real estate, you know, insulating from global risk, the public markets, you know, are training at PE multiples that are very much in the red zone.

Ari:
You know? So we’re asking for a major correction, if not for COVID and the money that’s been put, I think we would’ve had a major correction, which is also okay. Right. You know, the old saying on wall street is bulls, make money, bears, make money, pigs get slaughtered, right. And so you could make money as long as there’s volatility and there’s movement, and that’s fine. But with singles and doubles, you know, if you just look at the math, right. If you make 7% a year, and I know people want to triple their money, quadruple their money, and look, we wanna make money for our investors, you know, first and foremost, and keep a couple shackles for ourselves as well. You know, in the process, we’re not exactly running a charity, you know, but you know, but at the same time, you know, you can’t do that if you’re losing, if you’re, if you’re really losing money per se, right.

Ari:
And so we found that going after deals that are smaller than what private equity is looking at, but bigger than what local investors are looking at, there’s a mid share, certainly a multi in our multifamily platform, which is, you know, a nine year, you know, when you go after those types of deals, where your objectives to not lose money and you find a way through various stress testing, sensitivity analysis, you know, whatever that, whatever that is, you find that the probability of making money is substantially higher. Yeah. Right. Yeah. And so, and, and when you’re going after deals where you lower, what you’re in, what you’re, you know, and, and also comes back to the ethics around, under promising and over delivering. Cause if I have a significant belief or a high degree of probability that we won’t lose on the deal and look, I’ve done deals that I thought were gonna take a year and a half.

Ari:
It took four years. I thought we’d make 20% return. We made 2% return. Right? So again, back to not being a magician, but when you, when you have the philosophy around just losing money, so we’re investment committee, and we’re talking with the team that come from all different vantage points, we have a very diverse team, you know, not only from different backgrounds, but different, you know, creeds, different religions, different nationalities, which I’m super proud of to have those different angles and those different, whether it’s sociological for perspective, whether it’s a, you know, analytical perspective, having those different believable people around you to come up with the right answer and not trying to be right is very important. But, you know, statistically, if you can show a way that the downside has been protected, you have, what’s called an asymmetrical risk profile, and that’s a bunch of jargon like you, but basically what that’s saying is how can I take the least amount of risk to garner the highest return?

Ari:
And that might be, I take this much risk to make 7%. Okay. Mm-Hmm <affirmative>, but, but my risk is low and we’ve always been in that low risk, you know, kind of platform. And that gives you the staying power because when you make investors money, even if it’s smaller than, you know, maybe what another quote unquote competitor is doing psychologically, that feels good. They know they can trust you. They know that they can, whatever. And that Harbor’s referrals that Harbor’s more trust that Harbor’s longevity. And we were out to build something that’s gonna last the test of time and not try to just get rich quicker, flip this, flip that, you know, we’re very patient in our approach. But it all comes down to that. The ethos of the, of, of RACAR the DNA of Rastagar, which revolves around the human element of not just being numbers on a page, whether it’s our public pension funds that might give us 50 million, or, you know, we’re working on a deal right now where groups giving us a quarter of a billion of equity to build out a platform, you know, at the end of the day, like if you look at Texas teachers or Calsters, you know, they might give you a check for a hundred million dollars, but there’s a hundred thousand teachers behind that, that aggregated to get to that number.

Ari:
And we’re very focused on that human element that we’re in a place of servitude, a place of contribution, because if I don’t feel like I’m value, I don’t feel fulfilled. And you know, I’m not a Ferrari guy. I’m not a Rolex guy. You know, you know, my wife will probably still kill me that I don’t wear a wedding ring, but I also don’t wear any other jewelry. You know, I, I bought like five of the same Tiffany’s rings and I was done. Like I just spend them on the table and then than whatever you know, pull down the black hole. But the key that I have found, and I think a lot of people, you know, and, and, and so we’ve really ascribed to that methodology. And the more that we’ve done that and lowered our return expectation and rest test for capital preservation, a lot of times we’ve ended up making up a lot more money than we had underwritten. And that leads to this under promising and overdelivering, you know, concept, which is, is not only good marketing. It’s just the right thing to do, you know? And, and that’s very much you know, what we believe in.

Charles:
Yeah. I was at Warren buffet. First rule is not to lose money. And second rule is, see rule number one.

Ari:
<Laugh> yeah. Don’t forget. Don’t forget rule number. Yeah. Don’t forget the first rule, you know?

Charles:
So when you’re developing, obviously, you know, you’re buying stuff that’s already built. It’s, it’s a different, I think it’s a, it’s a different focus on where the market is and where the neighborhood is when you are building stuff. Cuz you’re in really hot markets. Let’s be honest. I mean, Austin, hot, Phoenix, hot. I

Ari:
Mean, these are well, Austin, I’m also born and raised in Austin. You know, the folks that rub this out are childhood friends. You know, these are, you know, and Austin is a town not metropolis. This is not Dallas or Houston where you, when you come in muscle your way in write a big check, they, it just doesn’t work that way. And there’s only so much Austin, right? Yeah. which is important to know. And I’ve lived in Dallas, I’ve lived in San Antonio over law school and I’ve lived up and down that I, 35 corridor, you know, of Texas. And Austin is a completely different market, but our focus within the Sunbelt, which encapsulates, you know, Phoenix, Nashville, Charlotte Raleigh, Tampa St. Pete mm-hmm <affirmative>. And like you said, we, you know, we have invested in, you know, 38 cities, 12 states, seven different asset classes and exited successfully the bulk of our portfolios within the Austin MSA.

Ari:
Although we’re expanding, we’re building the condos in Phoenix and seeding those markets again, but we’ve already been successful. You know, in those cities, if you look at our audited track record. But yeah, we do have the wind at our back, you know, as I think with the underpinnings of what you were saying. But at the same time, a lot of other smart folks know that too. Yeah. So, you know, what I found is in real estate, you make the money, the day you sign the contract, you know, and you have to create value and people are, oh, well it’ll pre at this. And you know, the markets are going up. We factor that type of stuff to zero. And you know, one of my old friends used to say you don’t have to plan for good news. <Laugh>, that’s a great thing.

Ari:
I like that. You know? So it’s like, we just, we just prepare for all the bad stuff. And if the good things happen, you get a little wind behind your wings or, or if you’re you’re you’re, you know, or, and I, I’m not the biggest sports fan. I watch my friends that are big athletes. Cause I love ’em. And or if it’s one of the greats like co you know, like the Serena Williams playing tennis or when Kobe was playing or, you know, rest in PE I like greatness, but sometimes when you’re swinging for that kind of single, sometimes your hips get around, it goes over the fence that might not have been the plan, but, you know, that’s always been kind of the way that we looked at things, but when you’re developing, it’s a different risk profile because a lot of other ways to mitigate that through cost completion, guarantees and bonds around them partnering strategic people. But the risk profile of its face of buying existing assets, finance easier, they have existing cash flows. And so it’s a matter of just asset allocation. Like, you know, do you, you know, what’s your exposure in multifamily? What’s your exposure, retail, what’s your we’re in portfolio analysis that still ascribe

Ari:
Possible to generate as much money as possible. And that’s always been what we do. And I don’t see that changing by any stretch of the imagination. People don’t come to us to go make, you know, five times their money. In two years, they come to us to not lose their money. You know, whether it’s through IRA rollovers of high net worth individuals, or even the pensions that need to hit their actuarial rate of return, which might be six in a, you know, six in a quarter or seven or whatever they’re coming to us for safety. And, and, and that’s, you know, and that’s what our focus is. So what has been your biggest obstacle as a real estate investor and entrepreneur?

Ari:
My ego. Hmm. You know early on thinking that I could do everything or thinking that I was right and wanting to be right and wanting to reinvent the wheel and back again. And one of my dear friends and invest, and then, you know, mentor you know, started a family business. But his father started of grocery anchors and, you know, he worked there for 30 years. They ended up selling it for nine figures, but these are just kind of, you know, his wife is a teacher, you know, and he was just a worker at his dad’s shop and they ended up buying more locations and reinvesting with no debt and had a nine figure exit a few years ago, which never was the plan. And he said to me, something very interesting, and I told him that I’m gonna, I’m gonna steal this.

Ari:
You know, I’m gonna use it as my own, although I’ll give you a credit. He said, dear friend of mine, his name is, you know, Randy, and I’ll send in this link and you know, he’ll watch it. But he said something to me that always really stuck with me, even though I told him that I’m gonna take it as my home, you know you know, Randy said to me, you know, look, Ari, I’m not trying to reinvent the wheel. I’m just trying to keep it balanced and aligned. Hmm. And yeah. And it resonated with me like it really me differently to hear him say that. And and I realized that that’s very much what we were doing. He just said it in a very poignant way. And I don’t know if his father said that to him or where it came from, but when he said it, I just kind of went dead silent.

Ari:
And yeah. And that, that’s really what, what we’re after is to find a, our way looking to the future, you know, you know, my, my friends and colleagues and, you know, certainly my wife and people around me make fun of me. They say Ari lives 30 years in the future, you know, and I’m kind of a middle child in the sense where I’m 39 years old. So I’m like the oldest millennial. So I’m like the big brother too. You, you know, all the younger guys, but I’m the little brother to the, you know, older real estate, you know, veterans. And so I’ve kind of like suffered from this identity crisis of not knowing exactly what it is. I still wear a three piece suit. So either you find me in a three piece suit or you’re gonna find me in AIC or a hoodie in my Lulu lemon and a pair of ye you know, we do a lot of stuff with Adidas.

Ari:
I know those guys really well, and they’re very dear friends of ours and yeah. You know, and, but again, it’s, it’s about, you know, that contribution of, you know, creating something that, you know, makes people’s lives easier, more efficient at a better cost basis. Not, you know, like we’re cheap cause that insinuates bad quality, but mm-hmm, <affirmative>, you know, you know, less expensive for the same value. And and we’re core value driven, you know, you know, they’ll say people that don’t know me, obviously, I was like, I’m, I’m, I’m not a shark. I might be a lion, but I’m not a shark. <Laugh>, you know, you know, like an Ari incidentally in Hebrew means, you know, means lion. And, but I’m a lion, you know, protector of the people that you know, are on our team. And and I’m proud of that.

Ari:
And I, I want my kids to be proud of me. I want my kids to be proud of their name. I want them to walk by these buildings and see a lot of times I sketch out the buildings he’s in my heart, I’m an artist. And Andy Warhol talks about business being the most form of art, you know, and, and that’s really been my canvas, you know, where I get to, you know, look at new design and new ways of thinking about what we’re calling futuristic, suburban, which is we build these big communities on these hundreds of acres, you know, having Iris scans to walk into the house, his keys and, you know, eliminating dining rooms, cause no one goes in the dining rooms, lowering the footprint, expanding the kitchens. Cause that’s where most people eat and being responsive to the technological, the way, you know, technological changes are better, said the way technology has changed the way that we live and not fighting the current, but riding wave of kind of figuring out you know, what the future is gonna look like for the younger millennials, for gen Z for that future.

Ari:
And you know, again, one of my partners would say, if you ever say anything good about yourself, you have to say, if I do say so myself. So if I do say so myself, I think we’re very well positioned with 400 years of conglomerate real estate experience of the PE level behind us to, you know, really, you know, help create what the future of living is gonna be. You know, the future of where they’re gonna, you know, kind of be entertained as well as living. And that’s the platform we’re building through a series of verticals through our industrial vertical for logistics, cuz in growing cities, within the Sunbelt that we named some of the cities you need good logistics. So if you need logistics and you’re growing, you need apartments. If you need apartments, you need houses, you need, you know, so they all kind of play into it. So we’ve been agnostic as to what asset class mm-hmm <affirmative> we go after because we’re looking at it from 50,000 feet of what’s needed within those communities, whether it’s office, whether it’s mixed use, whether it’s multifamily and finding strategic institutional partners, that’ll build out those verticals that are subject matter experts versus trying to be a bunch of Cowboys and just try to go do it ourselves. We believe in strong strategic relationships with subject matter experts. Yeah. So my, my next question here is we’re

Charles:
Following is we’re finishing up here and it kind of goes into what you were saying, but what are some mistakes that you see other real estate investors and entrepreneurs make? And is it being only in one asset class when they’re in real estate? Is that one of the things and what else do you see?

Ari:
You know I think people just, I look at mistakes different. So my book is coming out, this work called the gift failure. Okay. I’ll send you a copy, you know, when, when it comes out. And so mistakes to me, I look at with a slightly different cadence. And so knowing that my own mistakes, my own flaws, it’s hard

Ari:
Is another man’s treasure. You know, but I don’t know how exactly to answer that question because I could point out some things and it’s easy to point the finger. These is on social media or on this, or he did that. He cheated that and you know, kind of whatever, but there’s a lot of very smart people out there, you know, doing stuff that I might not understand, you know, and I’ve seen some investment decisions made where, you know, I looked at it and I was like, dang, that was pretty freaking stupid. And then, you know, a couple year down the road, I look back at the same deal, cause I’m a data freak and I follow this stuff, whatever, and I was wrong. So mm-hmm, <affirmative>, you know, I’ve been very reluctant to point out quote mistakes that other people are making. Cause I run my race.

Ari:
Mm-Hmm <affirmative>, I’m not looking left and right when I’m running the sprints, I’m just running my race and competing against the older, right. Matthew McConaughey talks about this. A lot of, you know, my competitor is me, right? And so I’m very, you know, reluctant to make any of those types of judgements. But what I can say for myself is the biggest mistakes that I’ve made are not surrounding myself with believable people from D vantage points wanting to be right. You know, and maybe, you know, taking that a little bit too far versus fighting the right answer. And knowing that it’s not about me, it’s about our investors, it’s about the community and, and, and pushing more towards growth and contribution versus being a money worshiper, which I’m not obviously we’ve created well, that’s no secret. But I attribute that to helping a lot of people.

Ari:
And if there’s any mistake that I think entrepreneurs would make, you know, as a holistic statement is having self-interest, if your doing something that is your self interest, just to make money. I don’t agree with that. I think that’s a mistake. I think that if you, you know, and I, I, I was talking about this the other day. I think they posted it on my social media that people always ask me, how do I big build a big business? And I’ve asked, been asked that question a million times and how did you do it so young? And I was like, yeah, you wanna work 160 hours a week and sleep two hours a night for 20 years. You know? So I’m like, like, like a 80 year old, 39 year old in terms of hours on a 40 hour work week, I’ve been working, you know, 10 years for me as 30 years, not counting compounded return, but if you want a big business solve a big problem, find a problem that affects a lot of people and, and make it easier on them and take your element out of it.

Ari:
And a lot of times I’ll look at, let’s say a marketing deck and I’ll be like, Hmm, I don’t really like the color scheme, but I’m not the customer mm-hmm <affirmative>. And so being able to take yourself out of it and say, oh, this is what the customer wants to see. They wanna see these certain things, but in my mind, I’m like, well, why don’t wanna see a 3d run bring, or I’m just using whatever random examples, but being obsessed with your customer in that Amazonian type mentality. That’s the mistake that I see globally is more self-interest than contribution. Interesting.

Charles:
So great. So how can our listeners learn more about you and your business? Ari?

Ari:
Yeah, I mean, it’s pretty easy to look me up. I’m writing a children’s book with a kid in the UK that was able to find me, God knows where, but a simple Google search of Rastagar or my name Ari Rastagar you’ll you can find me, you know, it’s if you really want to, and you have some or you app, you know, you wanna, you know, be a part of our, you know, RACAR family of investors, you can find us, you know, it it’s, you know, just Google my name, Google RACAR and you’ll see thousands of articles, hundreds of podcasts. And you know, yeah. It’s not that hard if on Instagram, it’s just at Instagram, you know, it’s a, there’s, it’s, it’s pretty simple. If you wanna find me, you’ll find me. And you know, we have a great team of people, great follow up. And you’ll find that the people that you deal with at our firm are very loving, beautiful, beautiful people that, and that’s, you know, I think if I had to say my accomplishment is being able to work with people that I love so dearly as humans and respect them tremendously.

Charles:
Awesome. Well, thank you so much for coming on today. If you wanna check out Ari, I would definitely start with that Forbes article about being the Oracle of Austin. It’s very interesting. And I’ll put all the links into the show notes. So thank you so much for coming on today and looking forward to connecting with you in the near future.

Ari:
Awesome. Thank you so much. We’ll send you the book when it comes out.

New Speaker:
Thank you.

New Speaker:
All Right, buddy. Talk to you later.

Charles:
Hi guys! It’s Charles from the Global Investors Podcast. I hope you enjoyed the show. If you’re interested in get involved with real estate, but you don’t know where to begin, set up a free 30 minute strategy call with me at schedulecharles.com. That’s schedulecharles.com. Thank you.

Announcer:
Thank you for listening to the Global Investors Podcast. If you’d like to show, be sure to subscribe on iTunes or Google play to get new weekly episodes. For more resources and to receive our newsletter, please visit global investor podcast.com and don’t forget to join us next week for another episode.

Speaker 5:
Nothing in this episode should be considered specific, personal or professional advice. Any investment opportunities mentioned on this podcast are limited to accredited investors. Any investments will only be made with proper disclosure, subscription documentation, and are subject to all applicable laws. Please consult an appropriate tax legal, real estate, financial or business professional for individualized advice. Opinions of guests are their own information is not guaranteed. All investment strategies have the potential for profit or loss. The host is operating on behalf of Syndication Superstar, LLC, exclusively.

Links and Contact Information Mentioned In The Episode:

About Ari Rastegar

Ari Rastegar, Founder and CEO of Rastegar Property Company, has established a reputation as a thought-leader in real estate with his innovative, technology-driven investment approach and strategies. Ari’s real estate investments span 38 cities across 13 states, and include vintage multifamily units, mixed-use complexes, storage facilities and more.

Ari began his work in real estate investment in 2006 while still in law school, before eventually founding Rastegar Property Company in 2015. Ari specializes in recession-resilient real assets and multifamily real estate developments and has built portfolios designed to reduce risk and maximize capital appreciation potential.

Known for his thought-provoking insight and no-nonsense delivery, Ari and Rastegar Property Company are regularly featured in both national and local news outlets including GQ, Commercial Observer, The LA Times and the Austin American-Statesman. Ari is also a frequent contributor to prominent publications like The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, CBS and International Business Times.

Ari holds a Bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University, as well as, a Juris Doctorate degree from St. Mary’s University Law School. Ari became licensed to practice law in Texas in May of 2009.

Ari has maintained his personal commitment to a purposeful life, which drives the culture at Rastegar Property Company.  Ari is a longtime supporter of charitable organizations that give back to the community like the Central Austin food bank, the Maharishi Foundation, and Ronald McDonald House.

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