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Global Investors Podcast
GI95: Transitioning from Engineer to Real Estate Investor with Lane Kawaoka
April 14, 2021
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Lane Kawaoka currently has ownership in 4,200+ units across the US. He lives in Hawaii and recently quit his day job as a Professional Engineer.

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Transcript:

Announcer:
Welcome to the Global Investors Podcast, a show that focuses on helping foreign investors enter the lucrative US real estate market. Host, Charles Carillo, combined decades of real estate investing experience with a professional background in international banking to interview experts in all areas of US real estate investing. Now here’s your host, Charles Carillo.

Charles:
Welcome to another episode of the Global Investors Podcast; I’m your host Charles Carillo. Today we have Lane Kawaoka. Lane currently has ownership in 4,200+ units across the US. He lives in Hawaii and recently quit his day job as a Professional Engineer. So thank you so much for being on the show, Lane

Lane:
Yeah, thanks for having me Charles. Appreciate it.

Charles:
So you have a very interesting background. You were working W2 and now you’re full-time in real estate, is that correct?

Lane:
Yeah, they did it a passive investing along the day job. Barely worked there at the end, but yeah, it took me about a decade to get out of the rat race. Okay.

Charles:
Okay. Awesome. So what was your background prior to starting going full-time into real estate?

Lane:
So I was a civil engineer, industrial engineer project manager did a bunch of construction progress projects, a lot of not broke, well construction, more horizontal construction where we’re dirt around building railroads and, and city streets and that type of stuff.

Charles:
Okay, cool. Cool. So why did you choose initially a decade ago or so to get into real estate investing?

Lane:
Well, I was sort of like an accidental landlord. I was living in Seattle at the time. Again, falling all this, like mainstream financial advice, dogma to buy a house to live in because that’s what everybody said you’re supposed to do. Just like to get a college degree at all. But I was never home because I was traveling all the time for work. As most young professionals are, you’re the person that they shove out there as a road warrior. So I spent a couple of years to save up 80 grand to buy a house in Seattle, and then I’m never there. Right. Because I was traveling all the time for work. So I just realized that maybe I’ll just rent it out. Right. I mean, if it was today, I’d probably be doing that turtle thing, right. If my car right. Utilizing on utilized assets better. But I started to realize that you know, the rents being brought in were 2200 a month. The mortgage was 1600. So young, 20 something year old kid, that was a lot of beer money at the time. And then I started to realize like, wow, if I just keep doing this a few more times, I’ll definitely get myself out of the rat race. And that’s where all this, this idea kind of spawned it, you know, start just bought more and more properties after that.

Charles:
Nice. So what is your current investment strategy and criteria when you’re looking at deals?

Lane:
Yeah, so currently I invest in syndications of private placements as a credit investor, the little single family homes that I got up to 11 of those turnkey rentals back in 2015, great way to get started. But and definitely for guys under a quarter million dollars net worth to get started to get your net worth up there. But I w you know, as a credit investor today, it’s just not scalable. So I like to sprinkle my funds no more than 5% of my net worth into any one deal over different asset classes, different business partners, different operational asset or business plans. And most of which are workforce housing multifamily. And the, you know, I think we kind of beat these markets up, like Texas, Alabama, Georgia, Arizona, that those types of Southern belt markets.

Charles:
Okay. And so when you’re going into a deal and you’re saying that well, the reason, what was the reasoning for you that you went from turnkey into, into syndications?

Lane:
Yeah. So when I had 11 rental properties back in 2015, I hadn’t maybe an eviction or two every, every year from one of these properties. And so kind of big catastrophe that happened every quarter, such as like a tree fall around in the house, or like a plumbing repair, like a storm came and kind of washed out a side of the house not a big issue, right. Cause you know, we’re using third-party property management on these and, you know, they’d take care of a lot of the dirty work for us and a lot of the headaches, but, you know, with 11 rentals, you know, that’s, that’s what happens. And with 11 rentals is maybe at few hundred dollars of cashflow per property. You’re looking at maybe $3,000, like passive cashflow a month, which is great, but I don’t know what American found me can survive off the regret. Right. You’re going to need more like $10,000 is what most people talk about. So multiply that by three to get 30 houses multiply those exception rates by three. Right? So now you’re talking about an eviction every other month, some kind of a catastrophe that happens and just, you start to realize it’s just not scalable. And that’s where I started to get around other high net worth accredited investors. And a lot of them used to own rental properties and they might say that it was a vital step. Some say it was a complete waste of time, but today they are investing in private placements in syndications.

Charles:
So you started passively investing after that, is that correct? Into syndications?

Lane:
Right? That was kind of how I got started because at the time, you know, as with, you know, just taking the step from being a a landlord where you can feel touch your properties as I was in Seattle, going out of state, you know, to go into a private placement and sign this 150 page document, you don’t know what half of it means. It’s a big step. Right. so it took me about 18 months to finally get enough courage to go into my first deal as a passive. And that’s kind of how I first began. And it gave me the opportunity to kind of see things from the inside, you know, what, what are things that as a passive investor, I want to see right. To gain that empathy or what a passives want. And then she started to run and operate my own deals. Okay.

Charles:
So what were you looking at as a passive investor? And I love that criteria about the 5%, because that’s actually something that I work off to, you know, not investing more than 5% of my net worth into any single idea.

Lane:
Yeah. So I kind of break things down like half, half, so 50% is the sponsor, you know, it’s kind of a, kind of a softer, more quantitative analysis of qualitative. Yeah. The quantitative analysis is the more than numbers side. So I’m actually able to on the right deals by taking the profit and loss statements around roles and kind of putting into my analyzer, running at the deal on what assumptions I think that deal should be able to do. So in other words, I can decode the code where I would say most passive investors don’t have a clue how to do that, which is why they like favor rely on, well, was he a nice guy? Right. What do other people say? So the way I do it is I underwrite the deal. I see what kind of assumptions that they’re going to make. And if I don’t like what I see, I’m not wasting my time even talking to the sponsor at that point.

Charles:
Yeah. Yeah. Do you, so you take their underwriting and you put into your own program or you manipulate their underwriter.

Lane:
Yeah. I mean, that makes it easier. Right? I mean, but if not, I can just take the raw data and kind of run it on my own. It takes a little bit more time, but you know, I, I think that’s what you have to do before. I think most investors get to a point where you just have a network of other pure passive investors around you and you, you have organic relationships with these people and you kind of trade off who they’re working with, who you’re working with and you kind of do test investments with operators, right?

Charles:
Yeah. That’s a great way of checking on operators. I’ve done smaller investments with operators before partnering with them, even on an active role to kind of see how the communication is, because I feel that one of the biggest things that pass investors and I’ve passed the invested before. And it’s just the lack of communication, I think, is the biggest problem that I think a lot of passive investors have, and they don’t know what’s happening. Right. You just, you find out, maybe some people talk to you quarterly. Some people talk to you monthly, some talk to you more off. So it’s something that I talk to my investors more often on that, because I feel that that’s something that kind of lacks, but what did you have issues with your first indications or your, your passive investings that you did before?

Lane:
No, not really. I mean, I, I kinda things went off pretty smoothly and maybe it was because of the due diligence process or just maybe just got lucky. I mean, my first deal I went into was back in 2013 and that deal didn’t go, well, the guy kind of just ran off with my money would probably be a failure. Right. Then what we’re talking about. But, you know, in hindsight, what did broke the Cardinal rule of never invest with somebody don’t know, like, or trust, or have like a deck golden referral from right. I mean, when, I mean, a go to referral is like, have someone that, you know, organically and you have a real relationship, not some kind of loose, you know, I had a beer with at one time, but a true relationship with somebody that actually invested 50 grand with somebody else. Right. So many people, you know, just kind of have these loose referrals, like, Oh, so-and-so is good. We’ll have you ever infested with them? You know, possibly not. Right. And that’s not that good level of standard, but when you’re first starting out, you’re not going to have these people in your corner as I didn’t have in 2013, which is why I invested with the wrong person. Right. But you know, if I would have known now or know who the peop my network today, I wouldn’t have invested with them, but Hey, that’s all part of the process. Right. It helps me deal with my network in the future. Cause not everybody wants to know who not to work with.

Charles:
Yeah. It’s a funny thing too. Like when we used to go to conferences and everything you’d go to some of these guru conferences and you’d be talking to people there and everybody, you would think that no one ever lost money at all, that was on the stage or anything like that. And I think people then that are, they’re like, wow. I mean, I can invest anywhere. There’s so much money to be made. You can’t lose money. And it could be with any type of sponsor that they find on the floor. Right. And they’re investing with and it’s completely, it’s completely wrong. But so other than having an organic network, how else do you suggest limited partners to vat potential sponsors?

Lane:
Learn how to analyze the deals on your own? That’s surely the way I think, I mean, numbers, numbers don’t lie. People do right. Sponsor. I mean, talking to sponsors in my opinion, kind of a waste of time, because everyone’s going to tell you what they, what you want to hear. I mean, I can tell investors what they want to hear my sleep at this point. Right. But referrals you’re right. Right. I mean, but if you don’t have the referrals, right. That’s what you have to work off of is the data that the raw numbers my role is profit and loss statement. So the properties, especially if you’re going into stabilize assets with a running track record of, you know, profit and loss statements, if you’re going into development deal, well, that’s going to be difficult to verify that, right. That’s where you really need to rely on a track record or referrals. Yeah.

Charles:
Yeah. I think one of the first things I look at when I’m looking at any type of underwriting, if it’s something that we’re going to be active on, or if I’m passively investing, it’s a looking at their rent assumptions of what they think that their rent is going to go to from what it is currently, and also seeing what kind of downtime they have during this whole repositioning process process. Because I feel that people are like, Oh, we can do, you know, X amount of units per month. And you’re like, if you do X amount of units per month you know, your, your flows, you’re not gonna be able to pay out any type of returns. You know what I mean for the first couple of years. So there’s a lot of things to look at. Even if the numbers at the end look fine, it’s kind of the process of how they’re arriving at it, that I found as

Lane:
Being faster. And that’s what it is to be a good astute, passive investor and LP, right? Like you’re not going to be an underwriting specialist, but there are things that you can possibly uncover in the pitch deck, even though the most pitch decks don’t have this to determine is this business plan makes sense. Right? Like, they’re kind of to your point, like if I see Gretz being increased more than 20%, I kind of scratched my head a little bit. Not saying it can’t happen, but I’m just a little bit more worried. Like, all right, well maybe are they making sure that their occupancy taking a little hit in the beginning as people give them the middle finger and we’ll follow up with a piece of the bump, the rent’s up that much.

Charles:
Yeah. I’ve seen somebody for that said they run from $500 to $800 a month. And I’m like, well, now every person in that property is now moving out because there’s not going to be anybody that stays there. That’s going to have a, you know, a 50% rent increase.

Lane:
Right. Right. And, and these are not, not like rules. Right. But it’s like, you know, Hmm. Interesting. Now let’s dig into that a little bit. Let me do my own comp analysis and figure this out. But unfortunately, most passive investors don’t have the data. Right. I mean, they could pop maybe the best go to rent a meter or check out the websites of other competing properties. But you never know. I mean, these, these properties all show well, right. They’re all pretty pictures. You don’t know if the comparable is a true comparable. If the exterior is pretty nice, but the interior is look like junk, right. It’s not a good comp. And I think that’s where ultimately you have to trust your operator to are those real cops. I mean, the end, they’re just shooting themselves in the foot if they’re being overzealous, but those rate increases and they’re just going to make passive investors upset with them in the future. But I know, I mean, it’s, it’s hard, right? It’s kinda like a marriage. You don’t know what you’re getting yourself into until the wedding bells go off and then you start to get into it. Right. In terms of, you know, you mentioned communication to me, look, I don’t care what they’re telling me every month. Just get me my results. And I want to see results in six months to a couple of years. Right. The worst thing I see is like, people giving me these really good thorough reports every month, but the thing doesn’t perform. Yeah. You know, go spend your time and stop writing the emails and go and, and get on those property managers.

Charles:
So when did you start going active in syndications? How did you do a number of different passive deals? And then you got a little bit more active on it.

Lane:
Yeah. I actually went active pretty early, but I was, had a pretty secondary role in a lot of it, but which allowed me to kind of learn vicariously in the jump seat. So I got to kind of sit, jump seat to a variety of different partners and that, and I started to realize that a lot of this is just, it’s like, I guess like most things, right. If you’d know what to do or more and more importantly, who to call in case of something happens, that’s really all that it is to be an asset manager once you get into operation. Right. I mean, most people think that they can be a general partner. I would say no, if do that, right, you can’t raise the money. You can’t get the deal flow or buy the, just to take that one ASP aspect, you know, getting deal for, from brokers. It takes most people 18 months to build up an organic relationship with a broker. And at that point they have to get lucky because they don’t have a track record of closing a hundred, 200 unit properties at that point. But as far as operation that’s, I think that’s the most learnable part. I mean, people ask us all the time, Hey, can we get involved in an operation? Like, no, there’s not much to do there. You know, we don’t need you. And especially we don’t want another cook in the kitchen too.

Charles:
Yeah, exactly. I mean, when we split up the asset management, there’s going to be someone that’s going to have contact with the property manager. And if there’s renovations going on there, there’s going to be someone that’s gonna be handling a lot of project management, but you can’t have like three people talking to the property manager. Right. I mean, they’re going to be like, who do I send these updates of evictions to and who do I send reports to? And who do I tell that this is an issue, but yeah, that’s very interesting. It’s, it’s also amazing too, when you’re talking about with different being resourceful is very important. I think. And I also talked to a lot of passive investors. I’m like, do you really want to be active? I mean, I personally for me, I mean, it’s much easier being a passive investor. We’re doing it unless you have a real if you really love, if you really love real estate investing. But so when you’re finding new operators, you’re telling us how you vet operators kind of as a passive investor, how does that, is that pretty much the same thing that you’re doing when you’re vetting investors as a when you’re planning on joining a general partnership with them. So when you’re becoming more active what are you looking at anything different than you were when you’re just planning on going passive?

Lane:
Same, same process, right? Like, I mean, it’s the filtering thing for me. I don’t have time to talk to people right. First. Right. I forgot to go by the numbers first and I take a list of 20 and I cut it down the two or three, and then I have a conversation with those people. So it’s just a, it’s just a filtering process. But it’s just kind of the same, the same thing, whether I’m looking to be LP or general partner. I mean, to these days, I kind of go off of my network primarily. But like, you know, I’m kind of just giving people practical advice because most people don’t have a network. They just listen to podcasts all day long and they don’t interact with people, the right people, right. High net worth accredited investors. But yeah, I mean, I, as you know, I do, I do a lot of apartments as operating, but when I get some outside my realm to like office space industrial self storage, you know, like I’m outside of my wheelhouse. So it’s, I’m kind of just like an LP at that point. So I’m following the same process as I’m doing every day. I’m always talking to people, but I’m going after passive investors first. Right. Cause they have they the data. So I need to go, I need, instead of wasting your time with talking to all of these random sponsors, I would say focus on the long game, which is building your network of a pure passive investors. They are, you’re going to find the people who are you want to work with. And also the people you don’t want to work with and then kind of work from there.

Charles:
Yeah.

Lane:
But I mean, I, I think that’s just the more long term sustainable way of doing it.

Charles:
Yeah. Cause amazing. Cause since I’ve been in that, I’ve been talking to other people and they tell me, Oh, I just reviewed someone’s underwriting from so-and-so and super aggressive and this or that. And when you start having your, when you get your start, you start using your network. As I’m making more decisions than just relying, just on the sponsor or on the information they’re sending over in, in, you know, like I’m not going to call a sponsors referrals that they give me because that’s obviously we know what they’re going to say. You know what I mean? I want to speak to someone else, like you said that hasn’t vested with them. And kind of what they saw after 24 months or 36 months where it was. And you know, I just want to kind of see how that, how that person works. Everybody has their own, I think every different general partner has their kind of own style of how they deal with passive investors and how they deal kind of with everything going forward, if there’s an issue. And you kind of want to learn that and make sure that you’re comfortable with that because that’s really, like you’re saying a marriage, it could be five, seven, 10 years. You know what I mean? That you’re going to be involved with this person on a monthly basis. So,

Lane:
Yeah. And, and kind of to, to kind of mention something there I saw recently, I don’t know what it was like a Facebook post, but like people were talking about getting references for an operator. And personally I don’t do that. Right. Because let’s think about it from the operator standpoint. I mean, if they, if these random investors are coming up and hitting up your three to 12 guys, you use as references, it’s going to be turned into a second job for them. Right. And not only that is like their personal information is from sort of out there. You know, I have a kind of a policy where I don’t give references unless somebody has net worth 3 million or above or 4 million above. Right. I, I just don’t do that. It’s just like, look, man, like I’m out there and you can, I have a lot of events to come and meet my guys. You know, I’m not going to make this easy for you. I don’t need your money. Right. I don’t need somebody to come in and kind of take, you know, I don’t, I don’t reveal the identity of my past my investors for their own privacy. Right. And if that’s a, that’s a, a game, a breaker for you, then I’m sorry. But like, or I guess I lose out, but yeah. I was like, you know, who would like, it’s always like the non-accredited investors to like, kinda think that they’re entitled to references and like, dude, you’re kind of a diamond. Does it even the guys that are one to $2 million net worth you know, go build your organic relationships on your own and you know, do this the right way.

Charles:
The other thing too with that is I get that as well from is not, not so much anymore, but I used to, it was a lowering minimums when you’re investing and and that was like, Hey, you know, I would invest, but it’s going to be, I can only do this and you’ve already spent a lot of time with them. And it’s usually always, you know, non-accredited investors that are, Hey, you know, trying to lower where you’re saying, Hey, a minimum is here’s 50,000 for an investor for investment. And Oh, you know, I want to come in, you know, I had that come to me and say, Hey, you can do 15 or something. Like, you know, come on man. Like, it’s, you know, it’s already been filled out. Like you’re not going to go. You know, so it’s just completely crazy. I get that. But I find the most sophisticated wealthier investors that we work with. They’re investing more in the sponsor than in the deal. And usually the money’s not really a thing. They kind of had set that aside. It’s really just knowing that you have the vision to manage the deal and whatever happens in it because my dad is passively invested, not in real estate, but in other types of private placement, memorandums and in deals. And he like lost on one deal and he reinvested and did really well on the second one that was there and for like 20 years into this deal. And it was it’s amazing. I was like asking me, he’s like, well, you know, the guy was had our, you know, and you listen to what it was. And my dad was investing in the sponsor. He wasn’t investing in the specific deal. Right. So we knew that this guy was going to have a home run at some point and just reinvest it again and not investors aren’t like that. Obviously they’re going to say, Oh no, man, this is a terrible deal. This guy does know what he’s doing. And then he did another deal and it was like that. So I think it’s just that the more sophisticated the investors, the wealthier the investor is I think that you see a lot more on just a sponsor and the kind of deals off to the side. But what do you see with that?

Lane:
Yeah. I mean, I think the more sophisticated or new she hired to the net worth the investor, the more grownup they act, right? Like they they’re kinda invest. They, what they, what I normally see people do is they’ll invest in a few deals just to try it out and get some data points. It’s nowhere near like maybe 5% of their net worth, you know, to do that. They understand the price is the price. They don’t haggle on it. And, and I always tell a lot of non-accrual investors, like just don’t do that, man. You already label yourself as a pain in the butt. I mean, a lot of these CRMs, you can just tag people appropriately as annoying as soon as the deal fills up, you know, you conveniently get left out of the deal. And it just, I think people don’t realize they think they’re interviewing sponsors, but it’s also the other way around. Sometimes they can complete completely the opposite way around where they don’t need investors and they’re interviewing you so it can quickly, they can cook, get, get you out of a deal. I mean, we’ve had deals where things don’t go well, and it’s a little Rocky in the beginning and we, we find out who we want work with long-term right. I mean, I don’t do this for money. I kind of just do this for kicks a little bit and to meet cool people who think very similar to me, like, you know, likes about like taking some calculated risks here, but, and you know, when everybody’s trying their best working hard, but when you find people with their true colors, right. That freak person who had that nice onboarding call, but then, you know, six months later when things are a little Rocky, they’re the one like kind of being a jerk and ankle. Yeah. They just, you know, they just don’t get invited the next time. It’s the party.

Charles:
Yeah. They’re being deleted off the the deal list. I’ve done that before, too. The other thing too is and then before we, can we wrap this up a couple last questions, but it was I had one investor once and I was like, Hey, just, you know, they, they contacted us and my assistant sent out an email, like, Hey, find a call, find a time here, set up a call, Charles. And he’s like, no, I gotta talk to him right now. I’ve got to talk to him. I’m like, this guy is outta here, man. Like I can’t wait 24 hours to do a call. He’s not even an, an investor. And I was like, it’s completely imagined that down the road, when you’re hitting you know, you hit 11% return instead of 12. And I’ve got to deal with this guy calling me all day long telling me that you know, it’s something went different than what he expected. And you know, just, it’s amazing how, and obviously a non-accredited investor as well, but so what mistakes do you commonly see newer experienced real estate investors make?

Lane:
I think they look at like the split structure or the fee structure. I mean, that’s important, but you know, if a deal is fatter, right, it’s a better deal that I think the general partners should ratchet up their speeds, their splits and fees, right. It all comes down to what is the performer at the end of the day, right? If you put in a hundred grand, what do I, what’s my expected cashflow, what does my performer set expectations there? I want you to hit it as a passive investor. Right? I mean, I think people get wrapped up over this fees and, and, and splits a little bit too much. I mean, it’s, I think it’s important to keep it within a reason, right? Like there are deals out there where the acquisition fees are con astronomical, like five to 8% sometimes, and they’re kind of hidden and different types of fees, but at all acquisition fee at the end of the day or at the close keep it in reason. Right. But I mean, I think, I think what you get in trouble is when these IEPs semi sophisticated investors, and they’re such a rules, they want to see happening, right. Like they want to have the sponsor have 20% of the capital stack of their money in the deal or whatever, 10%, you know, they’re just, they’re not rules, they’re kind of guidelines. And, you know, I mean, if a sponsor is very, you know, more to the institutional stage and I’m putting any money in, they have a track record, right?

Charles:
Yep. Yeah. For sure. Maybe they’re rolling some of their acquisition fee into the deal to the passive side, but they’re probably not putting up too much more than just some at-risk initially.

Lane:
Yeah. They don’t need to. Yeah.

Charles:
Fees are a big thing. I, that’s a great thing to just not to get off on a tangent here, but the fees are another thing I have people had to just like, they go through in the bank really like 2% or 3% of the acquisition fee. And you’re like, you know, 2% is usually what we charge, but as it’s getting harder and harder, I’m like, yeah, I mean 150 deals get to look at the, find this deal. You know what I mean? That’s a lot of underwriting. That’s a lot of brokers to email. It’s a lot of, that’s a lot of deals to review, you know? So I think that yeah, looking past the fees, I think people get really hung up on the, on the small things and they’re not looking at the ultimate business plan for the property and the amount of time and work. It actually takes to find a deal that actually pencils. But so what factors have you and your team implemented in your life and your business to have led to your success?

Lane:
Just make small steps and execute. I think that’s the main thing. I mean, just constant effort you know, leaving day jobs behind and focusing on a full-time and becoming a true professional. This is what we do, 50, 60 hours a week.

Charles:
Nice. So how can our listeners learn more about you and your company?

Lane:
They can check out kind of my background at simplepassivecashflow.com kind of started the podcasts originally talking about rental properties, turnkey rentals, but then, you know, I’ve kind of talked more about like high net worth strategies for the wealthy not tax legal deals are a part of the, of, of everything. I think the deals allow you to get a passive activity losses to now manipulate how much taxes you want to pay. But you know, I’d say two thirds of it is the taxes, the legal, if an a banking, you know, the other strategies that I’m fortunate. I think the deals is what attracts most people to the, the, you know, this financial independence world and certainly accesses, you know, the unlock, these tax benefits, but there’s a bigger world out there to truly pull this all together holistically.

Charles:
Okay. Well, I’ll put all the links to your podcast and your information into the show notes. So thank you so much for being on today Lane and look forward to connecting with you in the future. Yeah,

Lane:
Appreciate it. I’ll

Charles:
Talk to you soon. Bye bye.

Charles:
Hi guys! It’s Charles from the Global Investors Podcast. I hope you enjoyed the show. If you’re interested in get involved with real estate, but you don’t know where to begin, set up a free 30 minute strategy call with me at schedulecharles.com. That’s schedulecharles.com. Thank you.

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About Lane Kawaoka

Lane Kawaoka currently owns 4,200+ units across the US. He lives in Hawaii and recently quit his day job as a Professional Engineer with a MS in Civil Engineering & Construction Management and a BS in Industrial Engineering.

Lane partners with investors who want to build their portfolio, but are too busy to mess with “tenants, toilets, and termites” by curating opportunities in his “Hui Deal Pipeline Club” where his investors have personal access to him and know that Lane is personally putting his money on the line too. The Hui Deal Pipeline Club has acquired over $350 Million dollars of real estate acquired by syndicating over $40 Million Dollars of private equity since 2016.

Lane reverse engineers the wealth building strategies that the rich use to the middle class via the Top-50 Investing Podcast SimplePassiveCashflow.com. Lane’s mission is to help hard working professionals out of the rat race, one free strategy call at a time.

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