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Global Investors Podcast
GI84: Shifting from Passive Investor to Multifamily Operator with Randy Langenderfer
January 27, 2021
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Randy is President of InvestArk Properties, LLC focusing on creating investor value and passive income returns for the busy professional.

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Transcript:

Announcer:
Welcome to the Global Investors Podcast, a show that focuses on helping foreign investors enter the lucrative US real estate market. Host, Charles Carillo, combined decades of real estate investing experience with a professional background in international banking to interview experts in all areas of US real estate investing. Now here’s your host, Charles Carillo.

Charles:
Welcome to another episode of the Global Investors Podcast; I’m your host Charles Carillo. Today we have Randy Langenderfer. Randy is a passive investor on over 4,000 apartment units and a general partner on over 250 units. He has been a private money lender in the single-family space and has over 30 years of experience in corporate leadership. So thank you so much for being on the show, Randy, and, hopefully you can, correct my pronunciation of your last name.

Randy :
So you did great. It’s a, it’s a pleasure to be here this morning and look forward to hopefully adding some value to your listeners.

Charles:
Awesome. Awesome. So, can you tell us a little bit about your professional background prior to starting your, your current investment business?

Randy :
Yeah, so I took the pretty classic roads, you know, of going to college, getting a degree, joining a big company. You know, that was the way my father worked for his career working for a big company and encouraged me to get a, a good education and a good job of which I’m thankful for. I’m still in the corporate world today, but I’ve had the pleasure of serving in several different industries. And my expertise is really in the, I guess I’m educated in finance, accounting information systems. And my work experience is in the last many years has been around corporate governance areas, such as it security compliance, privacy matters as well as internal audit. Then I’m currently at a large academic medical institution in the Houston, Texas market.

Charles:
Okay, great. And then why did you choose real estate as your investment vehicle coming from the corporate world?

Randy :
So my journey began probably about 10, 12 years ago. I was working for a private equity company at the time, a global manufacturing and private equity company. And if you know anything about those guys, their turns are five, seven years max, just like a syndication, they’re gonna, they just, rather than we deal with apartments, they deal with companies, excuse me. And I had come to the conclusion that my time with this company was coming to a close in the next 12 months or so because it was going to be sold. And, you know, though I’m S students, I guess, as a finance MBA and a CPA, but it takes that real life experience to hit it home to say, you need to do something different. And so I started to I got, I got attracted to real estate by a brother-in-law at the time who had been a displaced exec, and he came to me and he had gone to Armando Legos. He’s a flipper that you may see in the late night infomercials at a school out in California. And he went there and paid big money, and he asked me to join him on flipping houses in South Florida. I said, you’re stinking nuts. And then he also said, well, really, if you want to do this, you need to develop a soft, directed IRA more funding than that. And I said, you’re double nuts at this time. Because as a, as a finance guy, you know, traditionally we’re risk adverse at heart. So that’s where it started in the, in the single family flipping spaces and realized that I needed to have another income. And so this is developing a second income stream and something that as I move out of the corporate world one day, I, I really don’t want to quit. I want to continue on and just change directions. So.

Charles:
Okay. So all the different kind of parts of real estate that you’ve been involved with, you lent millions dollars as a private lender for single family flips. You’re currently a passive investor in over 4,000 doors, which is probably one of the most for every, any person I’ve spoken to personally as a passive investor. And you’ve and you’ve also become an active investor with over 250 units. So what, like what, how does that help you coming from that passive side? And I would imagine, you know, lending on single family homes as a private lender, that’s kind of a semi-passive side, I would say. But how has that prepared you for becoming an active investor?

Randy :
I think what Charles would help me do overall is I think it helped me refine or define what I really wanted to do. You know, there’s so many aspects as you come into the real estate world, what you could do, single family, multifamily storage, mobile home parks buy and hold strategies, flip strategies in each. And so I started out in single-family because that’s where I had a mentor, a brother-in-law, as I mentioned. And I learned that I, I was living in the Ohio area at the time, and I relocated to Houston for business purposes when that private equity firm was ending. And I realized just how much work it was every to keep flipping it, to get turns and to get leverage scale that you had to do a lot of work, gaining comfort with the person doing the work, the comps in the area, the rehab plan, all that stuff became very detailed oriented. And so when I attended a single family session here one of the big educational sessions in, in Houston I really got turned on to multifamily. And so my transition was one learning the many different things out there to what I didn’t want to do. And then defining that multi-family was the area that really interested me, I guess, first of all, and the last two I would mention is I became in thrawled with the thought of non-recourse debt. I had looked at buying businesses along the way, but was very reluctant to sign personal guarantees. So the thought of syndication not having to own have millions of dollars, which I didn’t, or have to have to sign personally and put my, everything I had gotten so far in life, all, any assets I had accumulated in my house, my cars, everything else I just didn’t want to sign for those. So I think that start was very good and, you know, everybody needs to find out what’s their comfort zone and what’s in it for them because we’re all different.

Charles:
Yeah. I feel it’s a great starting point for new investors. What about for you? Is that something that you suggest to people when they’re interested in starting, but maybe don’t have the the expertise

Randy :
I don’t have the expertise and then reality is they may not have the capital either. I mean, let’s face it, multi-families a capital intensive game. You, it’s not a no money down no, Nope. You know, bad credit and all this stuff you see advertised. So Carlton sheets type programs to the cheeks. There you go. He was the forerunner to Armando month to Lego. But yeah, I think it’s a great place to start. And I think the ability to work with people of like-minded there to get houses and the flip, if you want to, because the fastest way to create cash, quite honestly, of what I’ve learned is flipping houses. There’s a risk involved. You have to educate yourself and find those, but the fastest way to make cash is to flip houses. Multi-Family is a long-term strategy, you know, three, five, seven years at a minimum generally buying old houses, you can do that, but if you want to generate some quick cash, single family flips is a good place to start.

Charles:
Yeah. The other thing about that too, is that with single family flips one thing that kinda S I I did years ago, and when I was active, manually active managing my real estate cause you had a lot more access to a lot of contractors regularly, so it was much easier to complete that. And I found that to be the hardest part of flipping the other thing too, is that when you’re flipping it’s, it has to be to the FHA specifications. So it’s very difficult to take a house that’s in terrible shape and make sure it’s, it fits all these different buckets, right. That are put out by us. So you can, they can get financing when you sell it. When you’re doing with multi-family, it’s a much longer-term play. And the people you’ll know that when you go to one of these conferences, whether the difference between the level of wealth of people that you meet at a multifamily or self storage con conference plus compared to a wholesaling or flipping conference, it’s everybody’s in a completely different financial position, which is interesting too. Cause they’ve already realized this is a five, 10 year investment scenario, right. I just don’t, I’m not just trying to pay my, get my car from that gain repoed next week. And it’s like different. And it’s like with re when we go into multifamily, you can go into a property and say, Oh, we’ll spend $5,000 to renovate this. Or we can just $500 to paint it and to clean it and we’ll rent it again. It doesn’t have to fit any specific kind of checklist, right. That we need to prepare it for the next person. It’s depending more of our decision of where we want to put that, that, that unit. So,

Randy :
Yeah. And so for the novice can become overwhelmed pretty quick with those options. I guess the, the thought I’d leave with your audience, if any of them were in that category just to get started you know, pick, pick up place and start because of the analysis paralysis is, is so easy to fall into.

Charles:
Yeah. And that’s, there’s so many different there’s so many different ways of how that pushes you back when you’re looking at properties. And there’s so many things you’re supposed to be reviewing before taking action, but that also, like you said, can really elongate the time before you actually purchase a property. So running, when we were talking previously, you’re talking about one of your investments and I believe it was like your first or second deal as an active investor general partner. And you had some, you know, some serious issues with that property. Can you tell us a little bit about that deal and what happened with it?

Randy :
You know, you all, we’ve all had those experiences in life where you look back and say that was very beneficial, but when you’re living through it, it’s extremely painful. And, and that’s, that’s the instance or you’re, you’re referring to Charleston. So our first my first multi-age, so I continued to invest both passively and actively, as you said I’ll always be both, hopefully for a long time to come. I just boost your returns, all, all the reasons, but the first general partnership was the classic, what not to do. So it was a property, 139 unit property in Beaumont, Texas. Now I’m in Houston. So it’s about a hundred miles East of Houston. For those of you who don’t know the geography, it’s a great community. It’s a blue collar community. So great for B’s and CS investing. They’re heavily tied to the petrochemical industry, but not necessarily gasoline, 139 unit flat roof chiller boiler built in 1965. And we bought it in, I think we closed in January of 18. And so first of all, anxious to get started in space. So, and I remember I had a mentor, a buddy at times as Randy don’t do a chiller boiler property just don’t do it. They’re so capital intensive, they are, they’re, they’re very efficient actually from a energy perspective, but they’re just very capital intensive. And, you know, if something goes bad, all 139 units go out, not just one unit and so large risks. So I hope you’re in for a little bit of a long story, but we bought it in January 18 and we decided to retain the property manager at the time because they had been involved with another local property we’re at, and we thought they were rock stars. So we bought the property in January of 18 and we’re all excited full of energy. You got to rehab budgets all already to go raised about a million and a half, $2 million, just gung ho. And in, we w I think we closed January 15, 2018, and it was approximately March 20th, March 15th of 2018. I get the call sitting in my office, Randy. I just want to let you know the building’s on fire. Oh my gosh. Well, what in the whole building, one of the buildings is on fire. So, you know, so immediately you can just imagine how that’s received two months into this. And they always say that, you know, if you do this long enough, you’re going to have a fire or a lawsuit. I just didn’t think it was going to happen two months in. So, you know, the, the, the lessons learned there were, there was a fire thank goodness property manager, the really good news is nobody was injured. There was no loss of life kind of did get out a local fire department was onsite. And you can imagine a 1965 building goes up like kindling because it’s nothing but frame. And so the lessons learned were the advantage of local onsite management get, get the services, the community services involved take a tenant focus, I guess, is that bottom line. It’s easy as the property owner to get real financially oriented, but as a human being, and as an owner, you really want to take a tenant perspective. So American red cross comes out, helps stabilize stabilize. The tenants gets them situated for the immediacy with some local vendors contributed to gift cards and stuff like that. It was only about 20 units that were affected out of the 139. But it was, it was, I think 10 of those units had to be re literally gutted and reframed the studs and everything because the roof had to be taken off. So one, a fire comes in and then we retain this property manager that we thought were rock stars and quickly realized upon takeover that we had asked them to switch out the onsite. And they had hired an onsite literally weeks before the fire. And she was a very good individual, but she had commercial real estate in the industry, industrial space, not multifamily, and that’s okay too. She was a great individual, but she didn’t have any backup from the home office. So in the ensuing months I effectively became the regional manager and I was spending probably 20 plus hours a week, making rent rolls maintenance, fixes hiring people assisting in that rehab inspectors vendors et cetera, et cetera, and fire. But it was, it was essential on the behalf of our investors. And I felt really compelled to make sure the vendors who were, I mean, the investors were safe and secure. So we were first and foremost wanted to do that. And so that’s in the fires in March. Fast-Forward in about October of 18, we replaced the management company entirely. We retain the onsite person, but Charles the lessons learned there is really onsite property management and the property management company do your due diligence. We thought we did, but you really don’t realize what a bad one is until you’ve had one. It was really, really much more work than we ever had to do in retrospect. So get to know property management before you make LOI, before you make a deal acquisitions so that they can be part of the transition and help implement your business plan.

Charles:
So you inherited that previous property management company. How did you find the new one? Was it done through

Randy :
That is a tough one on the fly when you’re in the midst of, you know, draining the swamp or something to drain the swamp. And so the reality is, is just calling fellow syndicators talking to educational groups in the Houston, who were they? One of my partners at the was a commercial broker. So he had some recommendations and it was just literally you know, keep calling until you can get somebody. And we actually found a really good one. They were like, it was just night and day. They, they, it was just incredible, the difference, the assistance they could give from, you know, the regional and the corporate office in terms of rent rolls and process. So it became after about early in 2019, it became pretty easy to provide the asset management, but also I’ll say we, when people ask, what, what does an asset manager do as a syndicator? I would say we, we earned every set of the asset management fee in that deal. Yeah,

Charles:
That, that’s very interesting. It’s also interesting too. I remember the first time I got third-party management, I mean, a 10 plus years ago on four, on a small portfolio of properties. And and they’re like, Oh yeah, sound like a one-year contract with, and I got, I found my father actually found it through a referral, and now I go back and really, you don’t understand if they’re going to be a good manager or not. And it really takes a year plus. So, I mean, I will never get another referral or I’ll never get of these major vendors that aren’t coming from, referrals, property manager being cause you get, you’re gonna get, as I found, some of the best and from brokers are fantastic. And investors with similar properties in nearby areas are, are even better. Right. And because you don’t know, you start, they start, Oh yeah, we’ve rented all these apartments. We rent it. Well, you know, just cause you rent that to someone doesn’t mean they’re going to be a good tenant and all this kind of stuff going forward and you don’t know, they’re not going to be a good tenant for nine months, 12 months in, right. They, everybody starts off as a great tenant. Right. And then some of them fizzle out when they’re not vetted properly. So you don’t really know exactly how good your property management is, I guess. And verify them until you have renewals coming up. People get renewed. They’re not just getting Hey, we’re not, we’re not renewing you on this because you’re a terrible tenant and stuff like this. So it’s interesting that with property manager, it’s not like you just don’t figure out right away if you’re dealing with a good company or not.

Randy :
Yeah. I echo that a hundred percent and you know, we, we thought we had done the due diligence asking the question though, you know, so are you a an ABC property management company? What’s your experience in this specific sub market? You know, what kind of resources tools do you have to offer? What kind of online or accounting tools do you use and, you know, do you use the accrual method of cash, counting plural versus accrual method and you know, subtle but big differences. How do you build community on a property? How do you try to create a sense of community? That’s huge for tenant retention and none of the big educators are teaching that stuff. They’re teaching them acquiring and underwriting and you get a 40, $50,000 a year on-site manager that is your arms and legs of a multi-million dollar asset. So

Charles:
Yeah, that’s definitely there. They’re talking about raising money and finding deals, which is very important, but the asset management property management really makes the deal. And if you’re paying $40,000 for a handyman and $40,000 for the admin person, right in the office, that’s doing leasing and collecting money. If it, if it runs like that these are the people that are actually the face of the property and they have to be very good. And it’s something that you can’t overlook that, especially with larger properties where you have on-site management, you know what I mean? And because it’s important for every day, they’re going to see, and, you know, everyday your people in the office are going to, or your tenants are going to see these people as are walking through the parking lot or through the hallways or whatever. So,

Randy :
Yeah, they’re the first impression that’s given, you know, the sign may attract somebody out front, but the leasing agent and the property manager sitting in the office or the other, you know, the old adage, you don’t get never get a second chance to make a first impression. So, so,

Charles:
So let’s talk about how you manage your passive investors during this. I imagine that was as much headache as the 20 hours or a big chunk of the 20 hours a week. You were spending becoming a general contractor overnight.

Randy :
Yeah. I,said, I got my honorary PhD degree in property management with that asset, but it was like I said, looking backwards, it was very beneficial. I think what we, what we tried to do was make it very personal. So, you know, we got the, I got the call. I said in my office the partners had a meeting that night and we all got on the phone the very next morning with our investors and started to, you know, not send out an email blast, but trying to catch them and talk through it, to let them know I didn’t leave any voice messages other than call me. I want to give you a quick update. And so trying to make it very personal, I guess, was the, so that they knew we took this very seriously. We were on it. And then after the initial one was just continued update every in the monthly updates. So we would provide itemization in the letter itself of the spend. So here’s, here’s what it’s going to take to refurbish this building. Here’s the estimated insurance proceeds and just showing a breakdown of what’s spent what’s to be spent as well as the w concurrently. We were still doing the initial cap ex enhancements. So it was, it became, obviously I ended up, I think we ended up putting almost $2 million in this, in this property at the time, but so communicate and you can’t over-communicate, as all I’m saying, you can’t give too much date data that in my mind that the tendency for some syndicators is just to give the executive summary, the three or four bullet points, you know, rehabs on target, blah, blah, blah. Yeah. I would just encourage more detailed than less in those environments. And yes, it was time consuming, but I think we built a lot of rapport and with investors and trust, obviously to managing expectations, when that happens, distributions are going to be this, we discontinued distributions for the immediate future to preserve cash. So we hadn’t, I mean, two months in, we hadn’t even started distributions, but we also Telegraph to them that distributions were scheduled to come in at six months, they were going to be postponed. We actually made one in nine months in 12 months, but we missed year one targets, but we had had that communication along the way that I think they were expecting it. So the good news I got to give you, the good news is, is we sold it 21 months in, in October of 19 for 120% return to investors. So we were static in the end.

Charles:
Yeah. So your investors will return your calls for your next project, I guess. That’s very, it’s, that’s awesome. That’s great to hear that, that you went through that whole process and you’re able to come out and fair. I mean, what the amount of experience received in one year that you probably didn’t want to receive, but now has probably shaped how you’re investing into the future. How has your operations changed over your portfolio going forward after this experience?

Randy :
Well, I think it’s now it’s, I don’t know if it’s because I’ve, I’ve done some passive and active or GP investing, but I think my criteria becomes more conservative. You know, I think the market situation, when I want it, you want to make sure, obviously that a property, a property can cash flow immediately. You may preserve cash and not making distribution for the first six months or so, but it’s gotta be producing cash right away. You have to expect some of those bad things to happen. You know, performance are always just proformance you know, and coming from the corporate world, you realize that not a lot of investors do, but it’s your track record. So we have a good track record on that one as we look for new ones, but it’s so it’s, I would say it’s, it’s underwriting, it’s looking for cash. And the other thing would be really to make sure we weren’t undercapitalized, but we should’ve asked and raised more money coming in than we did to have more of a cushion. So that would be another key element going forward. And the other ones are, I was back to the property management one. I won’t even write an LOI today, unless I’ve got a property management company in that sub market that I know. And I’ve talked to and have a relationship with.

Charles:
Yeah. That’s very, very important. I think anybody that’s not planning on active managing should have that portion of their team set up and vet it before they go. And just like, you’re going to have a, an attorney, your real estate attorney set up and your lender and all this are things that you should have in line before you’re putting out LORs. Definitely the property manager. Cause it is, I feel the most important piece of the whole investing puzzle, because like you said, they’re the, they’re, they’re your ears and your eyes of the property, but they’re also the face of the property for your tenants, which is super, super important

Randy :
And well put. And you don’t get that until after you’ve done it once.

Charles:
Yeah, no for sure. Or you get a bad one, right. So you’re a coach for new investors. What mistakes or any, do you commonly see new investors or seasoned real estate investors make?

Randy :
Yeah, so I guess the you indicated, so I started out at one of the large multifamily groups here in Houston and then transitioned to one in Dallas. And I’m joined recently ride Leafs organization as as part of his mastermind, but also am a coach because I really love to give back. I re I really like maybe it’s just cause of my season of life I’m in, I help many people have built into my journey along the way. And so I really want to give back may sound corny, but it’s true. And I’ve had several students. So the answer to the question is what’s the kind of mistakes do I see? I think understanding your, I sense that a lot of people, I come into our come in with the idea of get rich quick scheme you know what’s the 12 step process to have a million dollar portfolio in six weeks or six months or, or whatever. And that may be a little exaggerated, but so it’s the, it’s the get rich quick scheme not understanding the, the, you know, the challenges and the time commitment it’s really, it can be done. It’s very, I mean, if someone told me this real estate really isn’t brain surgery, it’s just executing. What’s been done hundreds of times by thousands of times by many other people. And if you study their models, but so I really enjoy talking to them and to get them all over the board. I think the other one is, is understanding your personality. You know, so the illustration I draw is you know, I’m, if you’ve ever heard the ready aim, fire illustration, right? So I’m I’m just that already aim fire individual, you know, learn the process, analyze it, implement it. And there’s a lot of people that come into it just, you know, they want to fire aim ready. I had one student was in Seattle and he was literally, I had, we’d had one discussion and he was going to become a GP at a property in Houston like an 80 unit property. And I said, have you been here and talked to the guy ended up, this was not, I don’t know if there was a class F property status, but since I was local, I just did online looking. I didn’t mean, but it was a class effort. I don’t know what’s after that G but it was, it was, you know, it was in the hood. So educate yourself. The encouragement I give to students is back to that, illustration of define your strategy, study the different strategies, and, you know, it’s a, it’s a marathon, it’s not a sprint stay in it for the long haul. Don’t get encouraged, don’t get discouraged and, you know, look for the singles and the doubles. And you do that over a long period of time. That’s better than the person who hits home runs infrequently and has strikes out as many times.

Charles:
Yeah, no, I definitely agree with the other thing too, is that you were saying about pill and analysis paralysis. And I think I’ve had that before, even after starting to invest into a multi-family and commercial properties. And I came to a realization years ago where it’s like, you know, cause you had some really good, you know, run properties and you’re like, Oh, that was a home run deal. We did fantastically well, and then you go through, you’re like, well not, everyone’s going to be like that. I’m going to have some doubles, some triples, some home runs, cause you don’t know where you are in the Mar market cycle. You don’t know how you’re acquiring, you know, the deal sourcing the deal from people. And so that’s a huge thing too, is that it doesn’t have to be a grand slam, every deal you’re doing. Just make sure it’s a good, like you said, a conservative deal, you’ve checked off a lot of boxes for it being that cash flowing from day one, all these important, especially when you’re having investor money, which you know, you really shouldn’t be doing a deal with investor money until you’ve really done some of yourself. So you can have an idea of what you’re doing before you take people’s money for something that you’ve never, you’ve never proven yourself. You know what I mean? You know, proof of concept, but yeah. Thank you. Thank you. What do you think are some of the main factors that have contributed to your success, Randy?

Randy :
One is I am a lifelong students, so I go back to that education. I started investing passively before I ever became a general partner because I wanted to I didn’t have full-time status in this. I still continue to work as we said, so lifelong student I wanted to learn. So I started investing passively. I joined the educational groups. I think many people pushed back, you know, well, I don’t have tons of money, whatever, but I, I think back to the amount of money I invested in my undergraduate and graduate degrees and with little or no expectations for doing that. But so education people need to educate themselves. And I think that’s huge is B back to what we just said. It’s, you know, the hair and the tartest the slow and steady wins the race. So just look at it as a marathon, be a student. There’s so many opportunities out there I’ve been doing multifamily for six years now, and there’s so many opportunities now to network you know, podcast local meetups, the, the national and the regional educational groups hang in those spots and you’ll get a ton of free education. And you’re hanging around with like-minded people want to do the same stuff. So I would say education desire to learn taking the long view versus the short view. Just a couple of nice,

Charles:
Fantastic. The other thing too, is that when you were saying about all the networking, I agree with that where I’ll go to a networking event for two or three days. And my thinking going into it is meeting one person or getting one kind of nugget of information, and I can look back on number of conferences I’ve spent. And you just get one thing that you hear from someone else, maybe just in a one-on-one you know, meeting in a hallway outside of it, or afterwards at dinner or whatever it might be. And you take that and you implement your business and it’s worth everything that all the time you spent and all the money you spent and everything like that. So you don’t know who’s going to give it to you and you don’t know where you’re going to get it. So

Randy :
And they’ll come where you least expect it. Yeah, for sure. You know, and as you start to attract investors, I do, and you have conversations, luncheons, zoom, appointments, whatever. It’s just fascinating. And that, I love that aspect of it too, as well as the analysis.

Charles:
Yeah. So how people learn more about you and your business, Randy?

Randy :
Well, Charles I think it’s the easiest thing is just to go to my website. It’s invest IMB S T hyphen Ark, a R k.com invest hyphen arc.com. There’s a, there’s a investor tab there that you can schedule appointment would love to talk with, with you if I can provide any value on anything today or otherwise, but it’s just a privilege to be here.

Charles:
Thank you so much, Ronnie. I’ll put all those links into the show notes and yeah. Looking forward to meeting up with you again here, connecting in the near future.

Randy :
Thanks so much. Have a great day.

Charles:
You too. Bye bye.

Charles:
Hi guys! It’s Charles from the Global Investors Podcast. I hope you enjoyed the show. If you’re interested in get involved with real estate, but you don’t know where to begin, set up a free 30 minute strategy call with me at schedulecharles.com. That’s schedulecharles.com. Thank you.

Announcer:
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Speaker 4:
Nothing in this episode should be considered specific, personal or professional advice. Any investment opportunities mentioned on this podcast are limited to accredited investors. Any investments will only be made with proper disclosure, subscription documentation, and are subject to all applicable laws. Please consult an appropriate tax legal, real estate, financial or business professional for individualized advice. Opinions of guests are their own information is not guaranteed. All investment strategies have the potential for profit or loss. The host is operating on behalf of Syndication Superstar incorporated exclusively.

Links and Contact Information Mentioned In The Episode:

About Randy Langenderfer

Randy is President of InvestArk Properties, LLC focusing on creating investor value and passive income returns for the busy professional.  He has been in multi-family real estate since 2014 as both a general partner/key principal in 250 doors and a limited partner in over 4,000 doors.  InvestArk offers the busy professional, who want to include multi-family in their portfolio, to partner with experts who are aligned with their investment goals.

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