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Global Investors Podcast
GI69: Investing in Mobile Home Parks and Parking Lots with Kevin Bupp
October 14, 2020
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Kevin Bupp is the Founder & CEO of Sunrise Capital Investors, which invests in mobile home parks, parking lots, apartments, offices, and single family homes all across the US.

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Transcript:

Announcer:
Welcome to the Global Investors Podcast, a show that focuses on helping foreign investors enter the lucrative US real estate market. Host, Charles Carillo, combined decades of real estate investing experience with a professional background in international banking to interview experts in all areas of US real estate investing. Now here’s your host, Charles Carillo.

Charles:
So welcome to another episode of the Global Investors Podcast; I’m your host Charles Carillo. Today we have Kevin Bupp. Kevin has been investing in real estate for 16 years and is the Founder & CEO of Sunrise Capital Investors; they invest in mobile home parks, parking lots, apartments, offices, and single family homes, across the US. So thank you so much for being on the show, Kevin.

Kevin:
Yeah, Charles, thanks for having me. I’m looking forward to being here.

Charles:
Awesome. Awesome. Yeah. Well, you have a very interesting story about how you got into mobile home investing and you started in real estate investing in multifamily. Can you give us a little background on yourself, both personally and professionally before getting involved in real estate investing?

Kevin:
Yeah, absolutely. Again, thanks for having me here. Yeah, so it actually even starts I’ll go back a little bit further multifamily. Cause I went through the, the stages that a lot of folks go through when they first get started and I started with single family. Cause that’s, that’s what a mentor that I’ve met back when I was 19 years old. That’s what, that’s what he did. He did single family and small multi-family where, you know, in Pennsylvania, in a small town where I grew up. And so I’ve always been of the mind, like, you know, don’t try to reinvent the wheel, right. Just if there’s something that’s proven that works, that’s go ahead and model after that. And so that’s, that’s essentially what I did. It took me about a year and a half to buy my first property after essentially being mentored by this individual, like outside of going to school and, and tending bar in the evenings to kind of make ends meet. I was working for free as an intern, whatever you want to call it. Basically I was trying to be around the same was David as much as possible so I could learn his business and whether it was he was doing and how he was making money. And and again bought my first property about a year and a half thereafter. I was, I was 20 years old and it was a single family property. And you know, for the first couple of years of my investing career, I was, , you know, I didn’t have a lot of money. I literally had $7,000 in the bank from I’d saved up tending bar. And that’s what I used that along with a private lender I’d met, you know, helped me fund that first property. And I realized very quickly I was out of money. And it was, you know, David’s model was buy and hold. And I realized very quickly that that couple hundred dollars a month positive cash flow, it was gonna take me a long time to be able to buy the next property. And I was literally, I used every penny. I had to do that first one. And so what I really turned my model into a Charles was a, you know, buy three properties wholesale. Two of them keep one by three properties wholesale to him, keep one. I mean, sometimes it, it changed. I had a wholesale five and I’d keep one. But bottom line is I would wholesale as much as I could to stack some money. And then I would keep one, whenever I had enough, additional liquid liquidity to continue buying and wholesaling more. And so that, that model carried on for a couple of years. And then I, I moved down to Florida from Pennsylvania and I met a lot of folks that were doing much bigger things. I mean, bigger than my small town, Pennsylvania. And it really opened my eyes to the world of, of private lending. Although I had a private lender up in Pennsylvania, it was a very different beast. When I moved down here to Florida, lots of different, lots of additional opportunities, a much bigger marketplace, many more investors, making big things happen. And so I just, I, again, I went back to modeling those that were doing bigger things and doing it right. And so I built a very large portfolio of single family properties slowly transitioned at the multifamily properties. This is all prior to 2008 crash and build a very large rental portfolio. Fast forward, you know, 2008 was a, was a very much a struggle for that in a couple of years there following lost a lot of the portfolio that I had built and and, and started a few other businesses outside of real estate just to keep the roof over my head. And you know, the fire never went away in real estate. You know, I was in damage control for a couple of years, but you know, the fire never stopped burning. And, you know, in 2011, I finally acknowledged that that fire and I decided to really do a you know, a self-reflection on what had worked and what didn’t work, you know, what I would do differently moving forward. And I realized very quickly that single family just was not, it was not efficient business model. It worked well for the time I did it. On paper, I built up a big, you know, a big net worth and it went away very quickly, but it was just a very inefficient business model. And it took a lot of effort and energy to build a substantial portfolio in that space. Back then, prior to the crash, I was single, I wasn’t married moving forward. I got married in 2010, we were talking about having kids. And so I had to do things in a little bit more efficiently moving forward and multifamily seemed to be the answer like that seemed to be the way to like rebuild very quickly at a much larger scale, much quicker. And just really during that, that kind of journey of taking that next step or the, you know, the, the, the first step in the second phase of my professional career, I was introduced to mobile home parks and just very accidentally, just like most things that happen in our lives, as long as you’re present and you’re aware, and you’re conscious, you know, good things will come your way and you just have to be able to acknowledge them when they present themselves. And and this was through by a gentleman named Randy. It was a mutual friend. Randy had been a banker for 30 years bought mobile home, but bought three mobile home parks after he retired. And I was going to do somebody, a mutual friend, and I just went and had lunch with Randy with no interest in his business. I had no interest Charles in mobile home parks at all. I just enjoy expanding my network and meeting new people and met with Randy for two hours. And he couldn’t stop talking about how great mobile home parks were, you know, pique my interest in many different ways of all the different aspects of why they are kind of a, you know, a, a superior investment to may the other types of real estate out there. And I, again, I like every time you can make money in every type of real estate asset class, but he didn’t just kept pouncing on mobile home parks and how great they were. And so honestly, I so much that I was so intrigued and energized by our two lunch, meaning that I left the meeting and I kind of committed myself internally to, I’m going to learn everything I can about this, and I’m going to go buy one. And the next year I’m going to buy a mobile home park here in the next 12 months. And I’m going to either approve how great they are, prove how bad they are, right. One or the other. And that’s what happened. That was the first one. I, it took me 14 months, a little bit longer than what I anticipated missed out on a couple of deals along the way. Cause I got cold feet and bought the first one back in 2012. And that was up in Atlanta, Georgia. I still own that one today. And fast forward now we’ve got parks in 13 different States and we’ve been doing it for now for, you know, going on decades, been eight years. And that is our core competency. That’s what we spend almost all of our time on and you know, outside of a few other investments, but like, that is what we do. That’s our business as a whole.

Charles:
So your company invest, like you said, a number of different asset classes. What is the current investment strategy for, for sunrise capital? When you’re looking at these properties, so you’re focusing on mobile home parks number and how are you also, like how are you finding them as well? Is it a lot to direct owner or brokers?

Kevin:
Yeah. And the first question about, you know, us investing in much, many different property types now just to get some clarity we, we only really specialize in mobile home parks and just very recently just started acquiring parking assets. So parking lots and parking garages, but that’s a very new part of our business. Mobile home parks is the core. I personally own a number of passive investments in many different types of asset classes, self storage, medical office retail, multifamily. But those aren’t what we do as a business. That’s, you know, very, very passive. Our active part of our business is mobile home parks and parking. And so as far as you know, how we find them, you know, we for many years, we, we most of the things that we purchased were direct to owner you know, mobile home parks, the mobile in bulk role has changed a lot over the past eight years since we’ve been in it, meaning that it was very much under the radar eight years ago. Even up until about three years ago, it was very under the radar, you know, not many large institutional players. It wasn’t the next hottest thing. It was just kind of a, it was a good old boy network. Like if you, if you bought a park and you knew it was doing well, like you, didn’t not that you didn’t share the word, it’s just, most people didn’t even want to hear it, right? Like it’s not as sexy as multifamily. It’s not as sexy as, as shopping centers and pretty much every other, any other asset classes, it’s just not sexy. Right. And so most people would normally just snub their nose and not give it the time of day. That’s, that’s very much changed. It’s done 180 degree turn. Now it is it’s a major asset class and there’s lots of competition, lots of bigger buyers and what happens. So back to the original answer I was looking to give is how we used to find them and how we still do. But about 80 to 90% of what we did up until a year or two ago was direct to owner. So we’d do a lot of cold calling you know, direct mail used to work really well. It doesn’t work as well anymore, but cold calling is, is probably our, our, our number one way of acquiring opportunities. And it’s not just a one cold call. It’s a, you know, we do the, we take the same role as a broker. Might, you know, we identify particular parks, build relationships with the owners and stay in contact with them for a very long period of time. A lot of times our deal cycle could last two to three years, you know, from the time we have a first point of contact to when we actually buy their property, if we do buy it. And so, and then on the flip side of that brokers, they’re a key component of our business as well. So, you know, they’re out there pounding the pavement all day long and looking for opportunities and we’ll come across ones that we might be missing on. Right. And so both of those ways are the primary ways that deals come our way.

Charles:
Interesting. How is the financing with it? Is it, I mean, we have all this kind of we call it gold standard, like agency debt, right. With multi-family. What do, how does that work with mobile home parks?

Kevin:
That’s a great question. You know, and up until up until five years ago, I would say that it was very challenging. It could be challenging to get a parks finance now, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have been in our space for, for, for many years. However, there you know, if you look back five years, their criteria was very strict. Like they would literally only lend on the criminal, the creme. I mean, like it had to be a five-star eco community. You know, all double-wide homes, you know, paved streets, two car parking pad sheds. I mean, like it had to be a premium community, which only represents a small percentage of those throughout the U S right know, five-star classification. And over the years they’ve come to find that a mobile home parks are a great asset to lend on. They’ve got a really low default rate. They had, you know, the lowest default rate aside from self storage during the downturn of 2008. And so over time, Fannie and Freddie have both gotten a lot more lenient with their lending. And so there’s lots of opportunity to get, you know, the gold standard of of, of debt on a property, assuming that it’s stabilized and it’s in a good market. And it’s a good quality asset. It doesn’t have to be a five-star they’ll lend the things even down to like a three-star. So, and then aside from Fannie and Freddie again, that’s really speaking to more, to like a stable community. You know, more for the value add plays, there’s plenty different local and regional and national lenders banks that will lend on mobile home parks, there’s life companies, you know that will lend them mobile home parks. I got bridge lenders. And then you also got CMBS that will lend a mobile home parks. So there’s lots of lending options out there. It just really depends on the asset itself. You know, what current conditions and how good are the financials? Is it stable? Is it distressed? The market it’s located in lots of different factors, so it can just like very, very similar to multifamily.

Charles:
Right, right. Yeah. That you’ll find someone to lend you money on it. If you can, if you found the right deal, if you exactly want to pay all, you know, the interest rate, which is very interesting as you know, the older I get, the more it’s important to me for finding businesses that have moats around it. And I remember my dad was a multifamily investor and someone brought to him. I remember I was in like middle school or something. He brought a like a junk yard, auto salvage yard to him to sell to him. And I was like, why dad would you want this? But, and he’s like, you can’t build any more of them. And I never thought about that. It’s something with mobile home parks. It’s very similar. No one wants a mobile home park in their, in their backyard. No one wants a salvage yard in their backyard. So how, how our new parks are their new parks being built in the US I imagine there are for those, you know, like you said, five star how has that today?

Kevin:
Yeah, no, that’s, that’s a great question then, you know, mobile home parks are the one asset class that the only asset class that have a declining supply. Right. And so there’s more parks that are being torn down and redeveloped than that are coming new on the market. And so there are, I don’t know the number that, that new, that new parks that get built each and every year, but I can tell you that the ones that are getting built are very high quality. They’re not your typical, you know, run the middle affordable housing workforce housing. I mean, they’re really nice communities cause you gotta, you gotta deal with a couple of things. You gotta deal with the, not in my backyard syndrome, right? Like the whole, like, I don’t want that built next to my house. And so like it it’s, in fact, I’ve got a close friend, that’s building a community now, like they just broke ground a couple months ago up in Washington state, but it’s a gorgeous community. I mean, it’s got a playground, it’s got a pool, it’s got a clubhouse. It’s all, double-wide these double-wide start at like $190,000. I mean, it’s, it’s affordable in that market, but it’s also equivalent to entry-level housing, right. As far as like very similar to what a stick-built might go for it in that same range. And so it, it looks like a stick-built community. And so you’ve got that to contend with. And then in addition to that, you’ve got municipalities, right? Like as far from a taxing standpoint you know, mobile home parks take up a lot of horizontal space, lots of ground there that they cover. And the tax base that a municipality might expect for one is very minimal, right? Like the improved land itself. There’s not a lot of improvements, not the same as that would go into a three-story apartment complex or a mixed use property. That same footprint could typically in a densely populated area or in a, you know, in a largely populated, missing a powder could be, the taxpayers could be much higher and just about any other use than that, of a mobile home park. And so you’ve got that, you know, that to contend with as well. And so a lot of times municipalities might have another reason to why they’re not approving it, but a lot of times it really comes down to money. Like what’s the best use of that land. And, you know, what’s going to benefit them the most from a tax perspective. In addition, the people that live there, who’s going to spend the most money in our area and our town and our city. Is it the people that live in the mobile home park or the people that live in a class apartment complex, right? So you got all that to contend with. And so very few get built on a regular basis. And the ones that do are very, not high, high end, but like, they’re, they’re much more kin to a a subdivision, a single family subdivision than that, of a mobile home park, workforce housing type arrangement.

Charles:
Yeah. Yeah. That perfectly makes sense. When they’re doing like subdivision, plat maps and stuff. They want to make sure that the people coming in there are going to be spending money and adding to the tax base their highest and best use of property. The what’s your strategy when you’re purchasing a property, then are you say you’re, you’re purchasing so many a park and do want to make sure that you own the, the the actual homes. Do you want to own some of them, do you want to own none of them, how does that work?

Kevin:
Yeah, no, that’s a great question as well. And you know, in a perfect world, we wouldn’t own any of the homes, right? Like, and that’s one of the attractions to this. This business is when you just own the mobile home park, the residents own the homes themselves, when there’s an issue with the roof or the plumbing or the AC or anything whatsoever, it has to do with that unit. They’re not calling us, they’re calling a vendor to take care of it because it’s their unit, right? So, very similar to that of a, of a homeowner, that’s what they are. They own their home. They just happened to be renting the land underneath their home. And so again, in a perfect world, that’s how it goes. And that’s how originally that’s how mobile home parks were built way back in the day. If you built it, they would come, you know, and a developer could just build the infrastructure. And back then there was a lot more many more consumer debt options available for the end consumer at one to buy a mobile home and move it into a community. And so, you know, a lot of developers could build these communities fast enough. And so like you build it, it got filled up. And then that, that model has really changed over time. A couple reasons is, you know, the big one is there’s not the, debt’s not the most attractive for the consumer side. And so if that individual actually has really good credit, more than likely, they probably could go just qualify for a stick-built home, you know. And so if you got someone that’s got a six 80 plus credit score, there’s other options for them. And so the ones that, that, that fall into the lower end bracket of credit scores that are looking for that more affordable option there might be paying a 10 or 11 or 12%. It’s straight. What have you. And so, again, it’s just not as many options for consumers to buy a retail home and move it into a community. And so with that being said what occurs a lot is when we purchase community, a couple of things, couple different scenarios ultimately could play out. There’s many means we’ve taken over where, you know, maybe it started off as a hundred percent homes were owned by the homeowners. And then over time, maybe someone passed away and, and their heirs didn’t want that home. And so now just by circumstance, the community acquires that home, they have a choice to either rent it or sell it, you know, sell it to another end buyer. Some community owners decided to rent them and they ended up acquiring a number of them, others, the smarter ones decided to sell it and kind of keep it as a tenant owned home community. Now, the flip side of that is you’ve got a lot of community as well, that you’ll find there’s vacant lots. And so my give you an example, a hundred space community maybe sometime over the years, you know, people moved, but that owner never proactively helped more people, you know, attract more people back into the community. And so you got like 20 empty lots or fully developed. They’ve got infrastructure. Well, no, it’s not good super data available. So not many people are moving their homes in. And so the only way you can fill those lots, because you want to, you want to increase the revenue of that community. And so you want to get homes on those lots is for the owner of the park to actually go buy homes, to go physically buy either new or used mobile homes and bring them in. And then again, you have that same decision of, do you want to sell them or do you want to rent them? And it really depends on the marketplace and what have you, which one is the, you know, the best business model for that particular community. And so with that being said, we own about 2000 lots today. And about 10% of our inventory, not by choice, about 10% of our inventory is made up of homes that we own, you know, homes that we have to fix the AC do turnovers on. It’s just it’s not as attractive of business model for us as it is to just rent the dirt out.

Charles:
Right. Okay. Interesting. Yeah. So 2020 has been a very turbulent time for us between COVID the economy riots, everything else that’s going on, how has it affected your portfolio and how are you how does your company maneuvering going forward?

Kevin:
Yeah, it’s a great, yeah. The question I can tell you that I think I’m not alone when I say that I lost a lot of sleep in March mid-March, you know, leading into April, not knowing exactly how not just the, our residents, but just, you know, resonance in general. Multi-Family residential retail, I mean, all of the above, right. How they were going to respond and how they were going to manage this you know, this, this catastrophe that was happening and, you know, thankfully the, you know the stimulus plan kicked in. And so a lot of our residents that might have been out of work or lost a source of income, a lot of them not just ours, but again, across the board have been able to receive, you know, unemployment benefits and then some additional benefits on top of that, that are pretty substantial. You know, at least, especially in the world of workforce housing, a lot of our residents might be making more money or they were making more money on unemployment than that, of maybe their job. And so I think that that definitely that, that curved the bleeding substantially, I mean, we, our collections were down a little bit on average two to 3%. But that was across the board, you know, so some communities were better than others. We had many communities that had no, no delinquencies whatsoever, and then others, we had an uptake. And so, but generally speaking things have been great, you know, things have been great. And we really worked, we proactively worked with all our residents. I mean, we were, you know, we set up a dedicated COVID-19 hotline where we literally took one of our staff and like that that’s all her job was for like three months is doing workout plans and making sure that we overly communicated saying, Hey, if you think you’re not going to be able to pay, please let us work with you. Like we don’t, we do not want to displace you. We don’t want to, you know, have you lose your home? What have you. And so we just tried to be incredibly proactive and just be there and listen, and, and, and, you know, offer options for the residents that, that needed to help. And so up until this point Charles things have been fine, but I, I will say that I do have concerns with, and not just for our industry, for, I’d say any residential landlord, you know, anyone that’s in that business of renting residential properties. I do think I I think there’ll be some pain felt you know, whenever the time comes, when the, the stimulus, I know they haven’t, they haven’t figured out phase two of it yet exactly how much it’s going to be. And like, they’re still through that. And so, like, we’re already starting to create this Delta, you know, that’s probably creating some angsty and anguish and pain, you know, with with people that are out of work. But whatever that kicks back in, and again, that will be another bandaid, but whenever that really does run out, whenever the stimulus runs out and people stop receiving the additional unemployment, unemployment benefits, cause the standard unemployment benefits you know, they’re not enough to really live. I mean, they’re just not. And so whenever that ends, I think that that’s when you know, the real test will become a, who can truly pay the rent. Cause I think at that point in time, we’ll probably find ourselves in like, you know, 10, 11% unemployment rates, right. I mean, there will be jobs that no longer exist that these people can not go back to. Right. So that’s, that’s where my concern lies, not just for us, but for, for, for you and for everyone else that’s in rental real estate. I think that’s where the pain truly comes to the light.

Charles:
Yeah. I don’t think it’s yeah. I, like you said, I don’t think it’s going to come to light until then. And we have no idea at the end of where we are at the end of 2020 before the election. So many stuff is going to be happening in this last quarter of 2020. And it, we’ll just, we’ll just really see how stable properties are and how stable tenants are at that point. So just working with them, like you said, which is the best way to, for everybody involved.

Kevin:
And I think if you have, if you have a job, if you have tenants, like if they have a job where they have the ability to work from home, then I think that they’re they’re much safer, right? I mean, cause you know, but if it’s a job, if they’re in the service center of their, you know, their waiters waitresses or, or just work in the retail space, that’s getting, you know, there’s layoffs left and right stores are shutting down. If there’s any type of service related industry that you physically have to be present, those are obviously the entries that are getting just clobbered right now. And those are the ones that more than likely there will not be a job to go back to. And so in a lot of that’s going to relate to probably more workforce housing and possibly even up to like maybe B class B minus. And so I do think that I know that normally the A-class is what a lot of people say, you know, gets hammered the hardest, right? There’s like this trickle down effect and I’m not sure, I necessarily think that will play out given this current circumstances. And so a lot of the A-class folks out of the white collar individuals have the ability to work from home. Most of them have the ability to work from a laptop. And so I think a lot of those jobs have a lot more flexibility than that of someone that might be making 12 to $14 an hour working as a waiter or a server bartender. What have you. So it’s just, okay. I’m not an economist, I don’t know, but that’s just common sense to me, seems like those are the folks that are going to have the hardest trouble and then a class are going to have a little bit easier time.

Charles:
Yeah. Yeah, I think so. I think we’ll just, we’ll see how the rest of the year pans out and how the rest of COVID pans out for what they’re going to do. But so what do you think are the main factors that have contributed to your success? Kevin?

Kevin:
Yeah. No, it’s a, that’s, that’s a, that’s a good question. I think a big one for me just knowing how my brain works, knowing everyone’s got weaknesses where everyone’s got strengths and weaknesses, I think whenever you can, the sooner you could identify what each of those are, and be honest with yourself, the, the F the faster you’ll get further along, right? The factual grows and individual. And you know, for me, it’s been focused. I’ve always been one to th to preach on, you know, pick a lane and stick with it and forget all the other noise. And when I say lane, I mean like an asset class, right? Like pick what you’re going to do and focus on it and take the time, take the years it’s going to take you to master it and become the best at it before looking at any other shiny object that there’s going to be hundreds on flying by you. Right. All the time. You’re always going to see, especially with social media now, right? Like there’s not that you can’t jump on a Facebook feed and see someone holding a checkup for like a, you know, a closing they had or a refinance or something like that, or a deal they just bought. And so stick in your lane and just focus and put the time in that it takes to, to master a particular area of your business. And, you know, if you can start it, pick an asset class and stick with it before you think about even pivoting or adding another, like for us, we, we stuck with mobile home parks for darn near eight years before we even consider, we consider about three years ago of looking at parking. It’s always been asset class. We’ve always been intrigued by it’s very much aligned with what we already do, but we just, we know that as soon as you start turning your head, that’s when things start going wrong with your present business, right? Like you start losing focus. And so it took us a long time before we feel comfortable with our systems and processes and the team we have before we even consider not pivoting, but just adding another asset class to our business.

Charles:
Nice. How are you guys finding those assets? And I mean, is that the same thing? Direct mail brokers, the.

Kevin:
Very similar way. And you know, the parking sector is very fragmented. Very much like mobile home parks probably were like a decade or two ago, you know, with very few large professional operators in the space, lots of mom and pops. And so you know, direct mail and cold calling has been you know, the number one way. There’s not really any, it’s such a fragmented industry and niche that there’s really only a few brokers in the country that even are the, you know, specialists in parking lots. And so, you know, even in mobile home parks, there’s, I mean, no less than a hundred brokers that like that is their, their core business. You know, some of them brokering mobile home parks, but parking lots again, I can count on one hand the brokers I know of that actually advertise as being parking specialist. It’s very few.

Charles:
Yeah. So tell us about you, you have a podcast. Can you tell us about your podcast or podcasts? I didn’t know if you had more.

Kevin:
Yeah, yeah, no, I’ve got actually have to. And so my, my primary podcast is called real estate investing for cashflow. I’ve been doing it for six and a half years now. And it’s a commercial real estate investing show where we basically interview owners and operators, professionals that represent every different asset class. And so, you know, folks like you, Charles, that do multifamily just had a retail guy on yesterday interviewed a self storage guy the day before that. And we’ve covered literally the span of every asset class. You can think of, including some very niche ones, such as marinas parking lots. I just interviewed a guy a couple months ago that the largest bowling alley owner in the United States. So it’s just still a business. I mean, he’s actually still doing well.

Charles:
That’s awesome.

Kevin:
Yeah. Again, there’s a million ways to make money in real estate. So that’s, that’s what that show’s all about. And then I’ve also got the mobile home park investing podcast, which, you know, as the name might say, it’s all about mobile home park investing.

Charles:
Well, awesome. Well, how can our listeners learn more about you and your business? Obviously we have your podcasts, but for your sunrise business.

Kevin:
Yeah. Yeah. So if you have an interest in what we’re doing in the mobile home park space the sunrise capital investors.com is our website. And then if you want to reach out to me and just learn more about me and what I’ve got going on you can just go to my website, which is Kevinbupp.com.

Charles:
Okay. Well, thank you so much for being on today. Have a great rest of your day, and I’m looking forward to connecting with you in the future.

Kevin:
Thanks for having me, Charles. It’s been a lot of fun.

Charles:
Talk to you soon.

Charles:
Hi guys! It’s Charles from the Global Investors Podcast. I hope you enjoyed the show. If you’re interested in get involved with real estate, but you don’t know where to begin, set up a free 30 minute strategy call with me at schedulecharles.com. That’s schedulecharles.com. Thank you.

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Nothing in this episode should be considered specific, personal or professional advice. Any investment opportunities mentioned on this podcast are limited to accredited investors. Any investments will only be made with proper disclosure, subscription documentation, and are subject to all applicable laws. Please consult an appropriate tax legal, real estate, financial or business professional for individualized advice. Opinions of guests are their own information is not guaranteed. All investment strategies have the potential for profit or loss. The host is operating on behalf of harborside partners incorporated exclusively.

Links and Contact Information Mentioned In The Episode:

  • Website: www.KevinBupp.com
  • Email: [email protected]
  • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RealKevinBupp/
  • LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevinbupp/
  • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/buppkevin/

About Kevin Bupp

Kevin Bupp is the Founder & CEO of Sunrise Capital Investors, which invests in mobile home parks, parking lots, apartments, offices, and single family homes all across the US. He has 16 years of experience in educating investors to locate, acquire, and create “higher than average” returns from the widely misunderstood niche of mobile home park investing. He shares his expertise through the Mobile Home Academy and also as the host of The Real Estate Investing for Cash Flow Podcast, which has become one of the hottest real estate podcasts on iTunes.

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