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Global Investors Podcast
GI50: Becoming More Strategic and Less Transactional with Rodney Miller
June 3, 2020
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Rodney is a Texas native, living and doing business in Oklahoma City. He is a successful lifelong entrepreneur and has owned several businesses ranging from a music rehearsal studio to his current chain of medical clinics.

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Announcer:
Welcome to the Global Investors Podcast, a show that focuses on helping foreign investors enter the lucrative US real estate market. Host, Charles Carillo, combined decades of real estate investing experience with a professional background in international banking to interview experts in all areas of US real estate investing. Now here’s your host, Charles Carillo.
Charles:
Welcome to another episode of the Global Investors Podcast. I’m your host Charles Carillo. Today we have Rodney Miller. Rodney has been investing in real estate for over 15 years. He owns and manages over 100 single family homes and commercial properties. He has a passive investor in over 2,500 units in six States and a general partner in over 14 hundreds units. Ronnie also runs a chain of medical clinics as a CEO. So thank you so much for being on the show, Rodney.
Rodney:
Thanks for having me.
Charles:
So I briefly touched on your professional background, but can you let us know exactly what you were doing before you got involved with real estate?
Rodney:
Yeah, I was a my dad was a 32 year employee of an insurance company, worked his way up to BP and all that. So I just thought I’d fallen in his shoes and went to college, which North Texas barely got out of college. I was a terrible student in high school. Got a degree in business with a minor in insurance, got a job as a claims adjuster. I found myself in a cubicle, hating my life, did that for three to four years. So started, started working on my escape plan. And then one day, you know, all these chiropractors with such claims, just aren’t dealt with doctors and chiropractors. So these chiropractors always took me to lunch and stuff and they seem to do really well. So I didn’t want to go back to school. I want to be a chiropractor. So I partnered with a guy getting out of school, graduated with chiropractic school. I knew the business end of, of the auto accident business. And he knew how to crack the bones and all that. So we partnered up, bought a clinic in Oklahoma city, other than Dallas time, we both came. He’s a buddy of mine. So we both moved to Oklahoma city, started bought a clinic out and then I bought him out about a year later and I’ve had the clinic since, you know, we we’ve grown it’s, you know, that was 94. I was 27 years old. We’ve grown from three employees to three locations, 22 employees, six positions, got it everywhere from surgeons to interventional pain management anesthesiologist. And our goal is to hit 10 clinics, you know, your period. So that’s kind of where that’s kind of, that was kinda, my that’s kind of still is my nine-five. I come to work everyday. I office out of one of my clinics and that’s kind of my bread and butter. And I looked at his real estate is kind of, you know, my future life someday.
Charles:
So how did you choose real estate as your investment vehicle?
Rodney:
You know, I always knew I needed more. I made a good money and everything, but I needed to figure out a way to really accumulate wealth and is, you know, doctors, high net worth people make good money, but your lifestyle usually creeps up into that area and you eat most of it up. And you, you know, and you know, I learned one valuable lesson, 2000, the stock market was not the way I wanted to accumulate wealth and was going to be a really tough way to do it. But I started looking around for options and I liked real estate because it’s easy to understand. It’s very controllable. I troll the outcomes and the tax benefits for years, I had really good you know, ordinary income. I needed some way to offset some of that. And, and real estate was just the perfect way to do it. After studying all that outside, I was going to Japan, but like 2000 for backup, I’ll generally get around 2000 family kids, good income, everything was going great. And, I just got creamed in that stock market crash. You know, that really hurt me. Then 9/11 happened and my business got a little shaky and right about that time, you know, it was just, I needed a backup plan. I needed, I needed a plan B, I need some to fall back on. I need it, you know, the clinics to do well, but I also needed something else that things didn’t go great kind of diversification. Real estate was a way to do it. And then around 2004, I got my, my son got an autism diagnosis and we really, things really changed for my family. You know, we, he was three years old and it really solidified my need for, for the need for stability. So we had a long talk to my wife. I remember we cried for weeks to try to figure out what to do. The research ABA therapy is extremely expensive. It’s 40 hours a week for kids with autism and you need it, you know, all the way up until their teenage. We’re going to be traveling where we tried different trove protocols on them. We didn’t have to redo it. I just told my wife, you figure it out. What got to do, I will make it happen financially. And I don’t know how I do it, but we’ll make it happen. And so that’s when I jumped into real estate, I was like, this is going to be how we make it happen. And so we’ll just go head first in the real estate.
Charles:
Right. So for the, for the additional income streams and also for obviously was very important, was the freedom of time for you with your situation.
Rodney:
Exactly, exactly. And so, you know, it was, it was more for the immediate need for cash for, you know, with Lyft and wholesale properties, everything. But what I found is that the real value in real estate is the longterm old, the longterm, you know, it’s just the benefits you get down the road and you can have both, you can get both cashflow and all that, but the big benefit to what really creates the generational wealth is the, is the down the road stuff.
Charles:
Yeah. It’s the equity ownership that really generates a wealth in real estate. And there’s so many other ways of making money in real estate, but they’re usually just a transactional paycheck, but I’m asking, so did you start investing in single family properties?
Rodney:
I started investing in single Flannery properties. What I did was, I wanted to really speed up the process. And so I went and joined home vestors, really home investors, the franchise, did we buy a house? Oh, ugly house franchise. So I jumped right in sign up with home investors. Cause I didn’t know anything about houses or construction. I didn’t know what was behind a wall. That was a mystery to me that any other wires and pipes and all that, it was just total clueless about real estate. So I jumped in on investors, got some really good training. And within three months of my son’s diagnosis, I was spending 10 grand a month on billboards, radio advertisements, mailers. I mean, I was just going full, full blown real estate. And so I’ve jumped right in. And you know, we start flipping houses, wholesaling houses keeping a few rentals here and there. So, yeah, just, just do it at first. But single family is just the way, the way I got started in business, not do that for a long time. And it took yeah, up to about five years ago, it took me about 15 years or so to accumulate about a hundred rental properties. So I stopped rehabbing wholesaling years ago, just a job is, you know, it puts you in the highest tax bracket. You’re paying 40% taxes on that and you’re running your file. So I got more into accumulation properties.
Charles:
So you, you did everything one by one. You didn’t buy as a portfolio, which I didn’t know, man.
Rodney:
I went out isolate every deal myself. There’s a lot of art. Jeez. A lot of time, man. It was really pain, but it was paying off now, but I wouldn’t do it again if I have a chance to do it over again.
Charles:
So I kind of know why you made the transition to multifamily, but how did you do it?
Rodney:
Yeah. Around 2016, once again, my son, he kind of plateaued in his treatment and then we started really, it became pretty apparent to us that he was gonna need to be taken care of full time, the rest of his life. Great. We weren’t gonna be able to do it. You know, I had kids later on in life. So now I’m looking at him, I’m 65 70. He’s going to be 30 and bigger than me. And you know, and he already is. He’s already at going to meet his staff. And, and, and when you have kids with special needs, you really got to start thinking strategically what you can take care of this child. W when you pass away, who’s going to take care of him. And where’s the money in account from because for somebody who will watch somebody with autism, it’s a full time job. You got to live in the house with him, you got to help him, babe. You got to help them do their food. You know, all that is is a, is a cause the job and it’s about a hundred thousand dollars a year, you know, cost to have somebody take care of your child. And it’s not something you want to do when you when you read before you die or when you die, then it happens. You need to do it before that. You need to have them situated, have them in a comfortable place, know that he’s a good place. And so that really, really changed our whole ROL look. We, we really had to figure it out how to do that, how to get that kind of income to make that happen about at that time, my wife got diagnosed with lupus too. So mandating all this got really difficult for her. I saw the writing on the wall, it’s going to kill her. She can’t do this. The rest of her life. She’s managing his therapy. We have therapists come in one day every day for eight hours a day and she’s managing all that and the stress and all that. So we had to get bigger, faster and multifamily was the way that I felt I could get there. And so then I start taking a really close look at multifamily and and it proved to be true because it took me the first deal I did was three month process of on a hundred, your apartment complex, which took me 15 years to get, to get a hundred houses, three months to get a hundred units. I was like, why didn’t I do this earlier? You know? So the scalability was just, just a big, important thing we have to skill master.
Charles:
Yeah. So yeah, that’s, it’s definitely three months versus 10 years that you waited for the same amount of units.
Rodney:
Yeah till like I’m in the medical business. So I consult a lot of doctors and these guys watch me do stuff and they’ll come to me and take me to lunch and be like, Hey, you know, I have a surgeon, I started a conversation surgeon a couple weeks ago. He’s like, I really, you know, I want to get real estate. So me and my wife said, we’re buying rental properties, you know? And I was like, dude, how much do you make a year? You make over a million. I know you own a piece of a hospital. You do surgeries. I was like, do you know how many single family homes in Oklahoma you would have to accumulate to, to replace your income? Do you know how long that’s going to take you to do that? And so I kind of steer them more to commercial real estate and a multifamily just based on where I’ve learned. So,
Charles:
Yeah, it’s also one of those things too, is I see people with high income jobs or businesses and they want to become full, active, real estate investors. I’m like man, you just want to be a passive investor. I would do the same thing. If I had this other business prior going on over here that was making so much money. But.
Rodney:
I talk to him about a transition start passively. Why you’re, you’re working on your craft. This is mostly the doctors. But someday instead of retirement transition into a full time real estate investor become a general partner. You’ve learned that you have to learn the business, then maybe you can sell your practice. And then you can get a laptop and travel around your beach house or whatever. And you can keep the money rolling in. You know, when you retire the money stops, you’ve got to get pregnant in the stock market. Hopefully you’ll get your separate percent returns or whatever, but this is a way to keep the money rolling in and you can make, you know, you can have fun doing it too. It’s it’s a fun business.
Charles:
Yeah. So that you focus on niches a lot between your medical clinics and your real estate investing. How important is it for an investor to realize a niche and settle on it and focus on it?
Rodney:
I think it’s extremely important. And I’ll learn this through my business career because I’ve worked my medical clinics. I was all over the place. Like my medical clinics, we’ve done weight loss hormones. We had a STEM cell therapy clinic and interventional pain management. And it wasn’t until I learned to stop looking everywhere and be good at one thing specifically, that things really changed for me and the same thing with real estate. You know, when I was doing single family homes, I was flipping wholesale part, my lender, my notes, some mornings, and you can’t get good at it. All those things, you can get mediocre at home, but once you drill down into one niche, one thing, or you put all your focus into that, you can be really, really good at it and Excel. And so with multifamily, I’m not, I’m not doing anything other than multifamily. I’m not buying houses anymore. I’m not loaning money. I’m not doing anything. I’m all in on multifamily that might extend to mobile home parks. Cause there’s a little correlation there and that is kind of multifamily. But other than that, I’m not really looking to do strip centers or, you know, new development, you know, deals are industrial. I understand multifamily the longer I do it, the better I get at it. And that is my niche. But niches, the richest are in the niches.
Charles:
That’s for sure. That’s definitely for sure. Absolutely. It’s also another, a whole nother ball game. When you’re going into a commercial asset, that’s not like multifamily where your, your you’re not going to be. Like when someone, I managed my own properties for six years and I, you know, I could put up an ad and I could rent it within two days in an apartment. Right. And after it’s made ready and it’s, you’re not doing that. If you are renting out a medical office with six examination rooms you’re not doing that for a store. You’re not definitely not doing that for 10,000 square feet worth of office space. It’s not, someone’s not, you know what I mean? it’s a, it’s a very, you’ve got to have bigger pockets and you’ve got to have for reserves and everything else that go along with it. So.
Rodney:
That always blows my mind. I’ll drive by you know, 20,000 square foot building, sitting there for years, just, you know, just sitting empty. And I’m like, who can do that? Who can get by a building and sit there for years while I need to taxes, insurance and all that waiting to fill it up. And that’s not the game I wanna play. I want him to buy stable assets with renters, multiple renters in one area and one building and you know, and manage that.
Charles:
Yeah.
Rodney:
Since to me, I’m not smart enough to do that way and I don’t have the money to do it the other way.
Charles:
One of my dad’s partners growing up, he used to say, commercial property is great when it’s occupied, but when it’s vacant, it’s extremely expensive and works. So we’ve spoken previously about being strategic in your multifamily business and not transactional. Can you explain like what that means to listeners?
Rodney:
Absolutely. So, so transactional, and this, this applies to any business, transactional. It’s just chasing deals. You’re out there chasing deals and you’re putting out fires and you’re, you’re, you’re just taking the business as it comes. It’d be like a dry cleaner, you know, just, Hey, you know, transaction, you get the club, you get the clothes, you clean them, you give them back. But, but when you really, if you really want to build a business and you really want to build something big and special, you have to be strategic. You gotta stop. You gotta slow down, take a few steps back and you’ve got to start planning. You got to plan out what you want and how are you going to get there. And it’s painful. It’s slow, it’s painful, but it’s so necessary to address those things. I met a guy at the BEC conference that you’d know who he is and he’s got a partner and very, they’re very reputable and they’ve done a lot of deals. And he told me, he was like, you know what? We’re slowing down because this is a manageable, we’re going to slow down. We’re not going to buy it for awhile. And we’re going to work on, you know, he goes, you know, we had two different emails. Once Gmail was a Yahoo, we’re going to get a website. We’re going to get the same email and we’re going to get on the same page and we’re going to, he’s getting strategic. But the best time to get strategic is when you’re not too big and you can get all the partners in one room and you guys could sit down for one or two days and really think through what your goals are and what you want out of life. Well, where do you want to take this? And then you start working your way backwards and you don’t stop meeting. You meet quarterly, you meet weekly and you have a, you know, you have huddles or what, what do we want to grow to when we get to 5,000? How many people, you know, what’s the word chart, how many people we need to bring on, we hit 2000 units. What are those positions going to look like? How do you know? And you’re just really thinking through the steps of growth and you’re, you’re setting, you’re setting goals down to the quarterly goals. And you’ve given everybody their rocks that they have to track and they have to work on and you’re holding everybody accountable and your buyers on the same page and you have alignment. Everybody’s moving in the same direction. The man you get so much more accomplished than Abe Lincoln said, give me six hours to chop down a tree. And I will spend four hours sharpening the ax. You know, that was kind of the whole, the same philosophy here. So,
Charles:
And with today, everything I speak to new real estate investors are people that are aspiring and they’re like, Oh, you know, I’ve got a partner, I’ve got this. And you know, they’ve got like, Hey, get out, get on Slack and all your stuff’s that all that stuff is free. Now. I mean, Slack is something you can get on it for free with as many people on your team, pretty much keep in contact with everything everything’s free. I mean, you can, you know, in the beginning stages, as you’re making money, as you’re growing, you have to start paying for stuff. But there’s so many, you know, for CRMs and for, you know, what we’re doing with zoom and anything like that you can get on touch. It doesn’t matter where your partners are. You can get in touch with them. You can, you know, there’s free goal planning, software, there’s everything. So
Rodney:
Absolutely. So this is the time to do it. Things were slow. I doubt anybody’s going to be buying anything the next few months, take this time to really plan out what you’re going to do when things soften up. And when everything goes on sale, plan out your business, give it to your partner. So, you know, Mike, Carl and I, you know, we were going to do a two day offsite strategy session. We had an implementer that was going to meet with us. It was costly. We’re going to sit down for two solid days, offsite somewhere, your plan out, you know, you know, what are our goals? What are, what are our values or common values? What’s our mission and how are we gonna, how are we gonna align ourselves to, to all that? They break down our goals and everything, and that all kind of fell apart with the scope and stuff, but we’re going to do it digitally. Now we’re gonna do it on zoom. We’ve got the implementer lined up and we’re going to spend in one solid day together doing that. And then we’re spending another day, put a bow on it, and then we’ll do a quarterly followup. We’ll do weekly meetings. And the meeting cadence is really word. Do you want to meet weekly? And you want to, you want to check off items that need to get taken care of. And everybody’s got their own honest daycare. Just, it’s just strategic. Yeah. Strategic.
Charles:
What a, what systems do you guys have in place to manage what you have going on now?
Rodney:
You know, it could always be better. We’re always improving, but we use that folio real powerful property management software. We didn’t have that before. We used another property management company and they had them really crappy system, but we got on that foot and it’s what I’ve always used front rentals. And we just, I just love it. Very organized. The athlete also came up with an investor portal, so we just got an investor portal. We started with the IDs model and then we got away from them and went to the app, folio this world. So now we have an investor system. So we have the investor portal. So for our investors, we have active campaign that we’re working on to manage all our prospects and leads. We’ve got a VA that we’re training now bringing on board to manage our active campaign. And we’re working on our systems and processes. We’re trying to document everything that we do, you know, new people that do their first transaction really highly suggest your first large multifamily deal. When you’re, when you’re in the process of going through your due diligence, working with your lenders, working with your, with your attorneys, document that process the first time document it. And then the second time put a boat, you know, really work hard. It really finding that process and document that as you go through it, because it’s going to be invaluable. The next time you go through the same process and you someday you’ll be able to take that, hand it to an employee and go here. Here’s how we take investor money. Here’s how we make sure that a sec requirements are made and all the forms are, you know, eventually you can, you can take that off your plate. I handle all the investor stuff the first time. And I don’t like doing tedious crap. That’s the last thing I want to be doing. I like to think high level is tricky, but I wanted to learn it so I could document it. I passed that on to somebody. Some they didn’t take it off my plate. And that’s just how you slowly build your systems for your company.
Charles:
Yeah. Record every step you’re doing with wherever you’re doing, like you said. And then when you’re hiring those, VA’s when you’re hiring that assistant, whatever it is, you now have a game plan, a business plan, a plan for them of what you’re doing for, to what you’ve done, right. What’s has to be done. And I do the same thing with VAs now. And we’ll do like when I give them tasks, we’ll do like the screen, you know, the screen videos, everything. And it’s like spelled down to the, you know, I can send to them and do whatever I want. Come back in 24 hours and they’ve started the project and there’s no issues cause you have to spend it. I think that’s the problem with people when they hire a VA, even if the person has experience in what you’re asking them to do, which was usually the easiest it’s, it’s always going to be a little different, so you have to spell it out and you’re not spending enough time with that. VA. They’re just going to be wasting time getting frustrated. You’re going to be frustrated cause you you’re just piecemealing together the plan of what you’re doing. But if you have a straight plan he sent to them, they’re going to appreciate it. And they’re actually going to know what to do. So,
Rodney:
Oh, absolutely. I’m to train and employ. You invest a lot of time up front with that person, just like you would have VA and you take that time to really get them trained. You don’t, it’s not a hit and run process because you will be frustrated and they were frustrated and will work out. You really invested the time and hopefully it will stick around or you invest a lot of time and effort and happily making sure that you guys are on the same page and they understand, you know, kind of their, their role and their position with your company. And it’ll pay off in spades if you do, if you do it the right way. So I totally agree with you on,
Charles:
So we’re going through COVID currently and you know, you went through the recession of Oh eight with 60 homes. How did you weather that storm?
Rodney:
Yeah, no, I really didn’t have to weather it. And that’s the beautiful thing, man. My houses are all bread and butter, $75,000 houses. You know, my typical, my typical on tenant, is it plumber or electrician construction worker? I mean in 2009, I didn’t really have any, any my biggest CS didn’t really get that low. Yeah. We didn’t see a whole lot of fallout. Rents kept coming in. You know, it blows my mind to this day. It just didn’t have any issues with it. And in 2009 rent started going up. People couldn’t get mortgages anymore. So more rentals flooded in the market. I mean more renters flooded in the market. So rents started rising with inflation and everything just went up for me and it just, it really solidified, but I made the right decision on going into, cause I had friends that went into the $200,000 houses. I like class C, single family homes and class C multifamily arms. And I’m hoping that what I experienced in 2008 with my single families. Well, for the most part you know, we reflected in this catastrophe that these folks can, can stay on their feet. They’re the backbone of the country. They get up and go to work every day. And I think with all these stimulus, don’t be thrown at them with the unemployment benefits and all that. He’d say do loser. These are jobs. I think that we will weather the storm. Okay. With these folks. Yeah.
Charles:
Back in OA, people were saying about problems they had with with some of their rentals. But with us, I wasn’t, you know, we weren’t raising rents aggressively, but they were still going up to 3% a year. So I wasn’t getting, you know, a huge increase on rent, but had no, I mean, it was the same, you know, same as collecting right now was it 10 years ago? You know what I mean? So it was it wasn’t that much different when you’re in that C class C plus housing where we didn’t have times we went with high vacancies or anything like that. But you know, I think if you provide your tenants, a clean, safe house and you give them a reasonable rent amount, they really have no reason to go to another house. You know what I’m saying? If you’re, if you’re in line with the other rents and you’re good proactive a landlord Mmm. And communication, just go to communicate with them. They’re gonna know you’re there for them. If you need anything, you got to be responsive. But if you do that, I mean, why would they leave for the most part?
Charles:
Yeah, for sure. So what is your team doing specifically yourself to handle a COVID? I mean, we know what the government’s trying to do and there’s probably going to be more to come, but what’s, what’s tried in doing.
Rodney:
Man, it just comes back down to communication. We immediately started really stepping up our communication with our property management companies. We’ve formulated plans on how we’re going to handle this. We, we, you could, I mean, I could give you links to the, if we did some, you know, at first we sent out a letter to all of our tenants, you know, the coronavirus update, what we see coming. We know the times might get tough for everybody. And just say, ask them, please communicate with us. We communication’s the key. And we will work with you. We will work with you and your situation. And then we sent out all the rent assistance programs, any, you know, unemployment benefits I can get. And we try to coach them and give them information on all the plans that are out there to help them in this time of need. And then we set up a payment agreement form. So if you struggle, this is not a red holiday and we want to make it clear to our tenants. It’s not around holiday. You’re gonna pay your rent. We will work with you. We understand you’re going through hard times. If you need to, we will work with you on your rant. We will do a payment program, let you stretch it out. Maybe we’ll put you on a, you know 18 month lease two and bumpy up a little bit to, to get caught up and all that, but we can work with you. And then we just try to build a fence around our herd. We went through all of our tenants and said, look, you know, we understand that times are going to get tough. You could get sick. We will be here for you. If you do, you’re in the right place. If you get sick, we’ll deliver your stuff to you. If you need it, we’ll run your errands for you. What are we going to do? So we just want to keep people in place, you know, for this, for the steel. And we have in this property that we didn’t tell us, we have about 30% section eight. And our original goal was to, you know, cause we’re not a section eight area. We were going to upgrade the property and we were willing to slowly transition out of section eight. We just said, freeze section eight can stay. We’re not going to put a lot more in there, but we’re happy. Let most folks stay there. Cause you know, their rent is almost guaranteed and we’ll work with them. And we’ll, we’ll, you know, we took our cap X budgets. We had a large budget for the Tulsa property. We just froze it. You know, we’re gonna do a lot of really interior upgrades, churn out the current tenants and all that. We stopped that we’re still gonna do our exterior capex projects because we really need to bring up the exterior of the property, but we need to reserve capital to where we need key capital in the council to see what’s going to happen over the next few months, we also stopped distributions. We temporarily suspended distributions to all investors and everybody to it understood and understood what we were doing. So for maybe two people that raised hell, but you know, we’re like, are you watching the news I go on. So other than that, we explained it to him, what we were doing. You know, they, I think they, they calmed down and everything, but you know, just, just trying to preserve capital and preserve the investment. That’s that’s the key.
Charles:
Yeah. It’s better to preserve the capital and hopefully you’re, you’re paying out those reserves later in the, or the the pref returns later in the year. But it, that’s better than that doing that than it is. Hey, we’re having a capital call and we need investors to put money back into the deal again. So.
Rodney:
Absolutely. And like I said, most people understand that most people have been in multiple deals. They know how, how private equity works and everything. So we didn’t get a lot of pushback, just a few people. Yeah. Two people,
Charles:
Of course, there’s always a need to get that.
Rodney:
That’s a pretty good number, I guess, you know, that are all our investors.
Charles:
So, so Ronnie, how can our listeners learn more about you and in your business.
Rodney:
I would say go to try that and multifamily.com, you can learn more about trying it multifamily and see the partners, Mike van and Carl super crop and kind of, you know, we’ve laid out everything in there that, you know, how would you business or mission everything that we stand for. We’re ratting a media page for all of our interviews and you know, we do a lot of podcasts, your be using, get out there. And so we’ll, we’ll have a media pacer out there pretty soon. If they want to email me, it’s [email protected] They can email me to reach me and that’s really it.
Charles:
All right. Sounds good. Thank you very much, Rodney, for being on the show and look forward to speaking to you in the future.
Rodney:
Thanks Charles.
Charles:
Talk to you soon.
Rodney:
Take care.
Charles:
Hi guys! It’s Charles from the Global Investors Podcast. I hope you enjoyed the show. If you’re interested in get involved with real estate, but you don’t know where to begin, set up a free 30 minute strategy call with me at schedulecharles.com. That’s schedulecharles.com. Thank you.
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Nothing in this episode should be considered specific, personal or professional advice. Any investment opportunities mentioned on this podcast are limited to accredited investors. Any investments will only be made with proper disclosure, subscription documentation, and are subject to all applicable laws. Please consult an appropriate tax legal, real estate, financial or business professional for individualized advice. Opinions of guests are their own information is not guaranteed. All investment strategies have the potential for profit or loss. The host is operating on behalf of harborside partners incorporated exclusively.

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About Rodney Miller

Rodney has been investing in real estate for over 15 years and has completed hundreds of transactions and built a personal portfolio in excess of $6M across multiple asset classes. He has been featured on several business and real estate podcasts and has authored 2 books on real estate investment. He also speaks at several local real estate clubs and hosts a monthly multifamily investment meetup group in OKC.

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