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Global Investors Podcast
GI46: Navigating SEC Regulations When Syndicating Real Estate with Mauricio J. Rauld
May 6, 2020
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Mauricio is the founder and CEO of Premier Law Group, a premier boutique securities law firm.  As a nationally recognized expert on private placements, Mauricio works with elite entrepreneurs who seek to increase and protect their wealth through syndications.

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Transcript:

Announcer:
Welcome to the Global Investors Podcast, a show that focuses on helping foreign investors enter the lucrative US real estate market. Host, Charles Carillo, combined decades of real estate investing experience with a professional background in international banking to interview experts in all areas of US real estate investing. Now here’s your host, Charles Carillo.

Charles:
Welcome to another episode of the Global Investors Podcast; I’m your host Charles Carillo. Today we have Mauricio Rauld. Mauricio is the founder of Premier Law Group; a securities law firm based in Southern California and focuses on assisting real estate investors with staying compliant when raising money from passive investors. So thanks so much for being on the show today.

Mauricio:
Well thanks for having me. Really, really appreciate it.

Charles:
Yeah, that’s great. So are you able to give a little background professionally on yourself before you started your current law firm?

Mauricio:
Oh man. I hate talking about myself too much, but yeah, so I started my law firm in about 2006. So before that I went, I did what every lawyer or law student dreams of doing really. Like I went and worked for a large law firm, a really one of the largest, the largest law firm in long beach, California. Why did securities work? And I did litigation. So I represented sort of the JP Morgans and the Prudentials and the Goldman Sachs and the Merrill Lynch’s of the world. But it was all litigation. So it was always, you know, something already happened. There was a lawsuit. I would be the one who got the complaint and then it was my job to go through that litigation process and put a response together, do the discovery, the depositions, the motions, the trial work, the appellate work, that whole thing, which was great. That’s where I cut my teeth. But I did that for about seven years. Just really knew that’s not what I wanted to do. You know, I shared my story many times and I just kind of, luckily for me realized, I think, it was after reading that rich dad, poor dad, great book by Robert Kiyosaki. I just knew that’s not what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. And so thanks to Robert’s book, I connected with the real estate guys and then made the decision to leave the law firm and go work in house for the realistic guys. And that’s kind of where I really cut my teeth on the syndication piece, still securities. But now instead of doing, you know, the litigation part, which is when everything’s already gone South, it’s on the front end, making sure that we’re doing the securities work properly, which is a lot more fun actually because now everybody’s interests are aligned. There’s no, there’s no battle between the lawyers. It’s the client, everybody actually likes to work with me now because they need me and our firm too, to get to their goal of raising capital and closing on a particular property. So it’s been a nice transition that happened back in Oh six.

Charles:
Yeah, I saw Robert Helms speak live a few months back. He’s great. He’s a great and real estate investor. It brings a lot of different experience. It’s a table with real estate investing being so unpopular these days, especially like syndication. There’s a ton of inaccurate I see on and mostly on social media. Are you able to give us an overview of what the typical, I mean, regulation D is normally and the 506- C, 506-B, which is most likely what real estate people are going to be using when bundling money, let’s say for purchasing a property. Can you give a little background on those, on that regulation?

Mauricio:
Yeah. So just a quick step back, anytime people are raising money and selling securities, we have to register that security with the SEC or we need to find one of these exemptions, right? Or otherwise it’s illegal. It’s kind of my third joke, but we never register things. So we always look for exemptions. And by far the most popular one is the one that you referenced, a rule 506-B as in boy. And the reason that’s so popular is because a couple of things. Number one, it provides us with certainty. It’s a safe Harbor, which means if we comply with all the terms and we’re kind of assured of being in compliance and certainties, obviously a nice thing for us, we don’t want to be doing things and having to argue in front of judges or regulators to try and figure out if we did it right, like we want to know that we did it right. And the other reason is we, it’s a federal statute and so we don’t have to worry about the state rules and regulations so we don’t have to go hire an attorney in every single state that we’re talking to investors or we’re getting money from investors, which would become really expensive and cumbersome and time consuming. And honestly a nightmare if you had to go compare and contrast, you know, eight different statutes from eight different States. So that’s why it’s so popular. And just as a really quick high end summary, you know with a 506-B you’re allowed to raise an unlimited amount of money, which is why some of those prior clients I had the JP Morgans and the Merrill Lynch’s, they use 506-B to raise billions of dollars. I mean I used to say, I used to reference there was a JP Morgan real estate fund that was 1.2 billion but I just saw and I posted it about a month ago, a Blackstone fund that was $20 billion. And you know, if you look at the filing it’s a five Oh six feet just like just like the ones that you and I do. It’s an unlimited raise which allows you obviously it gives you a lot of flexibility and it allows you actually to accept for us smaller folks that are not JP Morgan, it allows us to accept a limited number of non accredited investors. There’s one of the most attractive things for us, meaning we can take friends and family who may not be a high net worth individual that may, you know, credit investor, you’ve got to have a million dollars in net worth excluding your personal residence or have earned $200,000 the last couple of years with a reasonable expectation of bringing up this year. So with a 506-B, you can take a investors who don’t have that high net worth up to a certain amount. You have your, you’re limited to 35, but that typically doesn’t come into play. But the big, the big whammy or the big negative 506-B is, is really, you just cannot advertise. So you can not go to the marketplace on, you know, podcast or running ads and whatever media, traditional social about your deal podcasting. You just can’t do that. And so you really to stick with friends and family and people, you have a what’s called a pre-existing substantive relationship because it is meant to be a private offering and not not out for the public. So that are kind of the, the big, the big three things from a 506-B. There’s a couple other small ones, but that’s kind of the big, the big ones.

Charles:
So advertising is illegal for one and I’m, if I have a 506-B and I have a, I have a deal already in the contract and that’s what I’m planning on doing. So I can’t obviously bring that to investors that I’m, I don’t have a prior relationship with how are syndicators able to promote their businesses without promoting the offering.

Mauricio:
Yeah, that’s a fine line. So I spent a lot of time in the last couple of months on social media talking about this. You know, you see, you cannot obviously talk about the offer. We just went through those rules so you can’t talk about your deal, but you know, you’ve got a business to run, right? So, you know, you can certainly, the SEC has recognized that you can go ahead and talk about your business. You can talk about what your business does, what you do, what your credentials are and continue to market your services. Like you, you do anything else. You can also clearly do value ads, which is why podcasts generally are really a cool tool if done properly. Because you know, a good podcast is exclusively a value add. You know, you’re just providing great information with great guests and green for me. So that’s another thing you can definitely do. But, the tricky point is, is people have this tendency to not stay the course. And so they talk about their business or they talk about themselves and they do have nice value at peace. But inevitably what happens is they cross that line and they throw in the, Hey, look, if you want to learn how to make a lot of money you know, if you want 20% returns, give us a call. And that’s where things kind of crossed the line. It’s really, you know, just, just making sure that you stick to that. It’s, I think it’s very difficult to do, which is why my position has been, if you have an active deal, I mean two things. One is if you have an active deal, I recommend people just stay off of social media relating to real estate or the business, you know, posted by your kids posts about everything else. Fine, but just don’t, don’t even play that game. And then when you don’t have an offering going then value add and talk about your business. But the other thing that I’ve started to talk about quite a bit, and you’ll probably see a little bit more of it coming up here shortly, is if you’re going to play that game, which is like a fine line where you’re just talking about your business and what you do. Or my favorite is the value add. So putting out articles about, you know, why real estate is such a great investment vehicle or why, you know, the state of Texas or the, you know, Plano Texas is a great market. You can do those valuable pieces, but if you’re gonna do that, you want to make sure that you are steady. Like you are just consistent with those posts. Meaning if you’re going to post once a day or once a week or whatever, your consistency is just post once a or once a month. What you don’t want to do, which I see a lot of, is somebody doesn’t post anything there. They’re never on social media, they’re never on podcasts and ever do anything about their business. They never give any value add, they never do anything about their business. But lo and behold, two weeks before an offering, you suddenly see an uptick in the activity of these people. You know, talking about themselves and talking about social media because what they’re trying, I’m sorry, talking about the value because they’re really are trying to get people interested in their deal and then you know, as soon as the deal is done they go back to doing absolutely nothing. So you have this bell curve that exists where nothing has gets posted or no advertiser and no post at all. And then there’s kind of a bell curve and then, and then as soon as the deal’s over, it goes down. That’s not a good look because you know it’s going to be, it’s going to be obvious that what you’re doing is trying to garner some interest with your offering and it’s just, it’s just a tougher sell. You know, why would you just suddenly magically post a couple of weeks before your offering and then stop posting afterwards?

Charles:
Yeah. Yeah. The consistent value add is what I see from operators that I believe are doing it correctly, that are dealing with 506-B. Obviously with the 506-C succeed, they can pretty much put anything they want and you can tell it when you go to their website because they’re very specific on past deals. Yeah.

Mauricio:
Do you do still want to be careful with 506- C. 506-C is not a licensed to do whatever you want to do. I think that’s something else that people are not realizing. I think I’m starting to see more and more people do 506-C so I think this is why it’s coming up a lot. But even at a 506-C I would be cautious about, you know, giving really specific details about the returns or the IRR or any of that because the anti-fraud provisions still apply, which means you’ve got to give everybody, you know, full disclosure of the information that you’re giving. So you can’t just tell somebody they’re going to make 20% and then I can tell them kind of what the risks are. But obviously there’s no room in a post and a Twitter post or a Facebook post or an Instagram, but there’s no room for that. So unless you’re prepared to just put the big fat disclaimer on your post, I would say to a little bit more of a broader look. Hey, I’ve got a hundred unit apartment complex under under contract, I’m looking for investors and you know, on a 506-C you can definitely do that and then point them to your website or point them to a page and then there you can get a little bit more granular because there you’ve got way more room to put all the disclosure, at least preliminary disclosures because obviously the main disclosures are going to be in your PPM.

Charles:
Right, Yeah. The disclosures need disclaimers where they can learn more obviously. Yeah. That’s great. So for syndicators looking to accept money from foreign investors what should they, what should they keep in mind when you’re pairing to do it and then during the process, let’s say?

Mauricio:
Yeah, that’s a great question. A lot of people do have international investors. A couple of things you want to think about first, it may or may not apply to you, but if all of your investors happen to be outside of the U S all of them and you’re not doing any marketing efforts in the U S you’re not sale selling or marketing or have any investors, the U S a hundred percent of everything’s going happening off shore and the STC doesn’t care. Like they don’t care about international investors, they only care about US people. So there’s actually an exemption called regulation S REG-S that deals with scenarios where all of your investors are abroad and you don’t have to worry about 506-B or 506-C. Again, the SEC doesn’t care. Now if you’ve only got a few investors out there where there’s a mix and you’re still doing a 506-B, the other things you’ve got to think about primarily are you become kind of an IRS agent when you’re dealing with international investors because you are required by the IRS to withhold 30% of international investors moneys prior to sending them overseas. And the reason for that is quite simply, you know, there’s really no incentive for the foreign investor to file taxes in the U S and so if you don’t withhold it, they’re going to be gone. They’re not going to be filing any tax returns in the glass. So the way a mechanism of the IRS has to kind of get that money and the sponsor and the company could be responsible for that tax if they do not withhold and then the investor does not follow you a secretary. So that’s something you want to be really careful about. The other issue that comes up is obviously, even though on a foreign soil, the U S may not care about the foreign investor, the local rules and regulations obviously apply. So if you’re raising money from somebody, let’s say in Canada, then you obviously want to make sure if you’re traveling to Canada and you’re doing it there, that you want to make sure you’re compliant with Canadian securities laws or if you’re in Brazil, Brazilian, if you’re in, you know, in Europe, whatever, you want to make sure you’re complying with those securities laws. And then I think the last thing I would mention is just remember that not all countries recognize our entity structures. So we typically use LLCs, Limited Liability Companies. But again, picking on Canada, Canada does not recognize the LLC. They don’t know what that is. Just like there’s a couple of, there’s a bunch of other entities worldwide that we have no idea what they look like. And so if you create an LLC and bring in an investor from Canada, the Canadian government looks at, it looks at that as a corporation, a default, it doesn’t recognize the LLC. So it defaults to a corporation, which results in a double taxation as we know for the Canadian investor. So I’ve had situations where Canadian vessels are really upset at the end of the year because when they consult with their tax professionals in Canada, they, you know, they get double tax and their returns get withered down to almost nothing and it’s not really worth the investment anymore. And so they start complaining and you may have to return their money. So it’s just really important. And then there’s ways around that. So once you recognize that, you know, in Canada specifically they recognize limited partnerships. So we just kind of do that as a funnel. Other countries may recognize other entities so you just want to be cognizant of that and make sure that you’re structuring your offering to make sure that that the foreign investors their countries recognize that entity.

Charles:
Yeah, it’s really having a, having a CPA that you can speak to that is well versed in knowing tax treaties, knowing about foreign investors and that handle that part for you when it comes to distributions for your investors,

Mauricio:
It’s critical. It’s if you’re going to deal with, maybe I should add that to my list. If you’re going to deal with international investors or accept in and out, you really want to have a really good CPA that has experience in cross border transactions because not only on this, you know, 30% withholding, but just all those little things that come up, you want to make sure you’re dealing with somebody who knows what they’re doing.

Charles:
Yeah. One last thing I’ve heard from CPAs as well is when, so for this is for a syndicators is that don’t take any money internationally. Make sure it’s been sitting, it’s in from a U S bank account being sent to you because it doesn’t matter what’s, who are you are as a syndicator, you don’t have access to a hundred plus anti money laundering department at bank of America that can do their due diligence on X person and why entity. So

Mauricio:
Yeah, the anti money laundering is definitely another issue there. And again, I think if you go through the, like you mentioned, you’re spot on. If you go through you know, most, not most all monies that come in internationally actually have to go through what’s called an intermediary bank before it gets to your local bank. And that’s where they’re going to do their due diligence. You know, one of the things I may want to point out cause this has happened too is because of all these anti money laundering rules, that’s not so much that, you know, one of the odds of you accepting money from somebody you know as laundering money. But more importantly that money might get it has been frozen, meaning the money comes in, especially if it’s a large amount like this particular gentleman that I wasn’t a client, but he was telling the story where he had a $5 million check come in from overseas. Well $5 million is a big number. And so that causes a freeze at the bank level and it has to go through all these levels of approval. Like, I mean actually the government has the right to take that money. It might take two or three weeks for them to clear the money and give it back to you. In the meantime, this guy had a Monday morning close, so he was like sweating bullets because he couldn’t get access to the 5 million and he had a closing and things. So one of the things you probably want to do is if you’re expecting a large wire from, from an international, and like when I say what a large amount, you know, probably 500 or a million bucks, then I would probably check with your local banker just to make sure, Hey, what information do you need from me or from the investor so that we can make this as smooth as possible. Do you need a passport? You need ID, you know, what do you need so that when this money comes, there’s no surprises and that can actually use it within a reasonable amount of time.

Charles:
Yeah, no, that’s all great information that that every syndicator and every passive investor should be aware of before they get involved with with a transaction like this, especially when funds are not a hundred percent in the United States already. So one thing I want to circle back to, and you’re talking about different entity structures and not to go into the taxes, but to go into I saw you put up a post a few months ago about land trust, not having asset protection where I think every investor in the United States that holds real estate uses an LLC for the most part, right? If they’re not flipping for passive investing, let’s say. so can you give us a little overview of land trust, what they’re really used for and what, why they’re not asset protection?

Mauricio:
I mean, land trust, like you said, most people do use LLCs, maybe limited partnerships as well, but some, some, and it’s primarily in Florida to be honest with you. So I mean, Florida land, Florida land trusts are big. Just are big for, I don’t honestly don’t know why. But the one thing to consider is that all trusts, including your living trust are not, have no asset protection value unless they are an irrevocable trust. Meaning, once I set up the trust and I transfer the assets into the trust, I no longer have control or the ability to do anything with them. I can’t take the money out, I can’t do me. It’s literally an irrevocable trust, which usually is used as an estate planning tool to pass on, you know, your assets to your heirs. Or you know, what a lot of people do in the asset protection world, especially when you get to a certain level is you have an asset protection trust, which is again different from a living trust, which is different from a land trust. So unless it’s an asset protection trust or an irrevocable trust, it doesn’t have any asset protection value. So the land trusts are typically they’re definitely revokable. The argument for them is that they provide privacy, which they do. And so when you own real estate in the trust, it just provides a level of privacy. But you can, you can obtain that same level of privacy through LLCs if done right. I mean if you just create an LLC in Texas and that’s what I’m going to do it. But if you combine the LLC with a, you know, with a management company that’s in a state that has privacy, then there are definitely ways, I mean, we do this all the time that we can basically make you invisible if we want it to in terms of the public records of your ownership the way that you get around that, which is fine. So if you have a land trust, you have to have the beneficiary of that trust be an LLC. So you end up doing it twice. So you still have the same LLC that you would have set up if you didn’t have the trust, but you have the trust as well. And so anyway, so I’m not, I’m not a big fan of the trust and I don’t want to, there may be some other reasons to have it, but certainly not from an asset protection standpoint because it does just like your living trust. A lot of people say, well, I’ve got my house in my living trust, I’m protected. And that’s not the case at all.

Charles:
Yeah, yeah. No, it is big in Florida. It’s funny that you say that because I, I know a lot of wholesalers that preach about using the living trust as a asset protection as they call it.

Mauricio:
One caveat cause cause this, this may be, and I know this, this happens in a, although I actually looked into it in Pennsylvania, but sometimes there’s, there’s a tax reason to do it. Although I never got to the bottom of this. But there are some, you know, when you transfer real estate, there’s typically some States and some jurisdictions have high transfer taxes. And so sometimes having a, a trust may negate that transfer tax. And so again, there may be other uses for it, but it would not be an asset protection use.

Charles:
Right. Okay. Yeah. Mainly privacy. That’s what I’ve, that’s what I’ve heard. So you work with a lot of different syndicators. What are, what are common mistakes or pitfalls that you see with syndicators and overlooked items or something of that sort?

Mauricio:
Yeah, I think the number one, the number one mistake I see is just people not realizing that they’re, they’re dealing with securities honestly. So if they’re first time syndicators they don’t even know. They don’t know any better. They’re just like, Hey, I’m just raising some money. Why is the SEC even involved? Like I just want to get a couple of friends together and take their money and do this deal. And usually they’re smaller amounts, but then this is great on bigger pockets. And then somebody be like, Hey, you know, you really should talk to a securities lawyer. And they’re like, what do you mean? Why? So that’s kind of on the newbie side. But then on the more seasoned side, it’s just people trying to get around the securities laws by coming up with some, you know, interesting structure or it’s like, well I’m not, I won’t bring my investors in as an LLC. It’ll be a loan or it’ll be a side contract or a profit sharing agreement. Or maybe we’ll do a TIC agreement. That’s one of my favorites, joint venture. And at the end of the day, as you, you’ve probably heard me beat this one like a drum. You know, any time the structure itself doesn’t matter, right? So whether it’s an LLC, a profit sharing, a TIC, a joint, it doesn’t matter. It’s, if you’re taking money from investors where the returns are generated by your efforts, it’s a security. In other words, if your investors are passive in your active, even with a joint venture, by definition, it would not be a joint venture. But profit sharing agreements, side letters, high fives, handshakes, it doesn’t matter. So that’s probably one of the biggest mistakes. The next one we kind of alluded to a little bit is just people posting on social media along with a 506-B deal. I see this all the time. I’ve been trying to, it’s kinda tough cause I’m, you know, I’m friends with most of them, so I can’t just put the post off there as an example, but I, so I’m sorry to take it from other sources, but people posting on social media is a big one. And then the other one that’s becoming a big one that I’ve also been a little bit of a broken record on is just paying people to raise money for you. You know, people aren’t aware, they’re not lawyers and that makes sense. They’re not aware of all the licensing requirements that you need in order to raise money. And when you’re raising money for yourself or you’re a sponsor or co-sponsor, then there’s some exemptions you can rely on. But the amount of people that I see that are just purely money raisers that get compensated, you know, our percentage of the GP, depending on how much money they raise or bring into the deal, and that’s the only thing they do that’s broker dealer activity. They’re acting basically raising money without a license. And it’s an issue for the syndicator because the syndicator doesn’t disclose that. Right. Why would they? They’re not disclosing that they’re paying somebody or they’re paying an unlicensed broker to raise money for them. And then on the, on the person’s side, they’re obviously practicing without a license. And so now you know that their penalty is disgorgement. They’ve got to return the money plus interest. But I don’t care too much about them. I care more about my clients that are syndicators. And so that’s, that’s what I wrestled with is just making sure they understand that, you know, you know, sometimes you just need to raise that extra couple hundred grand to get it over the finish line. And it’s very tempting to have somebody come in and do it in exchange for compensation but can’t do it.

Charles:
Yeah. Make sure that every person that’s involved in the general partnership has some sort of a role in addition to bringing capital to the deal.

Mauricio:
They’ve got to be, yeah. The keywords there that they’ve got to have substantial duties and their primary role needs to be something other than raising money. And to me, primary just means you know, more than 50%. So look at all the activities you’re doing is more time spent raising money or is more time spent doing other things like due diligence and underwriting and investor relations and you know, visiting the property and you know, everything else that syndicators do. Talking to the lawyer My goodness.

Charles:
So one more thing too, just for the listeners, when he said TIC it’s tenants in common, which we won’t get into. You can just Google that on your own cause it’s a very in depth. There’s all different facets to it. But so I’m ready to go. When should a, when should a syndicator contact you to start the process? Say they, when, when do you like to hear from them

Mauricio:
As soon as possible? Typically I’ve always recommended people call the attorney as soon as they get into LOI. Just because again, at that point you’ve identified the property and we can not have any substantial conversations about the particular property you’ve got. You’ve probably got a property package. We can start the conversation. Now that we’re also doing the real estate and transactional piece, we’re also now working on the person, the sale agreement. So obviously we want to get involved at the LOI stage cause we’ll, we’ll probably have three or four days to get a purchase and sale agreement drafted and ready to go. So it’s gotta be early. You know, I know that some people will either argue or even teach that you want to wait until you clear due diligence before contacting the attorney because Hey, what the risk is, you know, you pay the attorney a big fee and then you end up deciding you’re not going to move forward on the property. My response to that is it just puts a lot of pressure on everyone because now you’ve cleared contingencies and now you’ve got a little, not that much time to raise money. And it takes a while. The process does take a little bit, although we do have a pretty fast turnaround speed. But you know, I alleviated that a while ago by just you know, just getting a, yeah, just a credit. So like, Hey look, if you end up pulling out for whatever reason on due diligence, we just credit you to the next one. Anyway. So I weigh that risk and really encouraged people cause I really wanted, we make so many decisions on the front end of how we’re going to do this offering. And so a lot of what tends to happen is if I get a call too late in the process, we may have this discussion and be like, Hey, I want to do a 506-B because I want to take non-accredited investors. And it turns out that been posting on social media for the last couple of weeks or a couple of months cause they didn’t know. And so we just hire our hands. That’s why it’s so critical to do it early because we can make all these decisions on the front end, come up with a game plan and then we can then disseminate that information and talk to our investors in accordance with whatever rules and regulations we’re going to pick, what exemption we’re going to go with.

Charles:
Okay, great. So after the LOI is executed, then they can reach out to you, let you know and kind of start working with you. And it’s great that you’re able to do that with the credit to the next deal. So I haven’t heard that from other attorneys, so that’s awesome.

Mauricio:
I just try and eliminate, you know, I just try to eliminate the risk from, from people. Yeah, so I mean, we’ve been tinkering. I mean, we do, we’ve been doing this for a long time. So we tend to listen to our clients and so we tweak things to make it as easy as and as frictionless as possible for clients.

Charles:
So, Marie, so how can our listeners learn more about you and your firm?

Mauricio:
What’s the best way to get ahold of me is, is either through the website, premierlawgroup.net. Obviously I’m super active on Facebook, so if you want to check that out, that’d be great. I post a lot of stuff on Facebook and then my YouTube channel. And if you want to email me directly, you can always reach me [email protected] I am coming out with e-book that’s coming out that’s should be coming out here in the next two or three weeks called the five fittings. Every syndicator must know to stay out of jail. So if you want a copy that you can just shoot me an email and just put this a podcast on the rail line and I’ll send you a copy as soon as it’s done.

Charles:
That’s awesome. Yeah, it’s a great name too. I saw you going back and forth and brainstorming. I’m social about that, so that’s great. Well, thank you very much for being on the show this afternoon and I look forward to speaking to you in the future.

Mauricio:
Thanks Josh. Appreciate it.

Charles:
Talk to you soon. Bye. Bye.

Charles:
H i guys. It’s Charles from the Global Investors Podcast. I hope you enjoyed the show. If you’re interested in get involved with real estate, but you don’t know where to begin, set up a free 30 minute strategy call with me at schedulecharles.com. That’s schedulecharles.com. thank you.

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About Mauricio Rauld

Mauricio is the founder and CEO of Premier Law Group, a premier boutique securities law firm.  As a nationally recognized expert on private placements, Mauricio works with elite entrepreneurs who seek to increase and protect their wealth through syndications. Mauricio specializes in Reg D exempt offerings and educates investors from around the world on how to navigate the complex world of securities laws. Known for taking complex matters and making them simple to understand, Mauricio is sometimes, jokingly, referred to as one of the few lawyers who actually speaks English.
Regularly traveling around the U.S. as a noted speaker to business groups, Mauricio is also as regular contributor to The Real Estate Guys™ Radio show (consistently one of the most downloaded podcast on real estate investing) and is Robert Helms’ personal advisor.
Twice a year, Mauricio joins Ken McElroy (master syndicator with close to 10,000 apartment units totaling $500m) and The Real Estate Guys™ to teach a few hundred students, the ‘Secrets of Successful Syndication’ a comprehensive course on raising capital for entrepreneurs.
Once a year, Mauricio shares the stage with the likes of Robert Kiyosaki (Rich Dad, Poor Dad, best-selling financial author of all times), Tom Hopkins, Simon Black, Peter Schiff, Chris Martenson, and others as a faculty member of the ‘Summit at Sea’, a week long high-level summit with elite, like-minded real estate entrepreneurs.
Mauricio previously served as a member of the elite group of “EVG Advisors” who along with the Elevation Group,™ are committed wholeheartedly to provide real education often overlooked by traditional educators.
With over 18 years of experience, Mauricio has previously been selected as a “Southern California Rising Star” by the Southern California Super Lawyers Magazine, recognizing him as one of the top 2.5% up-and-coming lawyers in Southern California. A graduate of The University of California at Berkeley, Mauricio obtained his Juris Doctorate degree from Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, where he was a member of the Scott Moot Court Honors Board.

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