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Global Investors Podcast
GI43: Generating Passive Income Through Airbnb Rentals with Jorge Contreras
April 15, 2020
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Jorge Contreras is an Airbnb Expert and Real Estate Investor. He is passionate about helping others live their best life by mastering financial literacy and emotional intelligence.

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Transcript:

Announcer
Welcome to the Global Investors Podcast, a show that focuses on helping foreign investors enter the lucrative US real estate market. Host, Charles Carillo, combined decades of real estate investing experience with a professional background in international banking to interview experts in all areas of US real estate investing. Now here’s your host, Charles Carillo.

Charles
Welcome to another episode of the Global Investors Podcast. I’m your host Charles Carillo. Today we have Jorge Contreras. Jorge is a real estate investor with a focus on Airbnb investing and mentoring. He earns passive income by strategically choosing and managing Airbnb’s. So thanks so much for being on the show, Jorge.

Jorge
Thank you. I appreciate you having me on. It’s quite an honor to be here.

Charles
Yeah, It’s awesome to have someone on with different specialists you know, special skills that they work with and yours being Airbnb is not something that we typically speak about on the show. So can you give us a little background on yourself prior to starting your current business in real estate career?

Jorge
Prior to real estate and Airbnb?

Charles
Sure, yes.

Jorge
Yeah, great question. So my first business was, I was 20 years old. I became a professional dance instructor. So I used to teach bachata, which is essential partner dance from the Dominican Republic, and I got to travel to over 25 countries. I was able to create With my partner, the very first chafa Latin dance festival in Los Angeles, the first nightclub the first team, so we definitely pioneered and got a lot of experience when it comes to like personal branding, marketing sales and building team systems operations that had eight streams of income, and then was able to start utilizing that income to reinvest to invest into real estate back in 2012. So that’s what I did. I created a really successful and big personal brand in the land and space. And I no longer do anything with Latin dance, everything I do now it has to do with real estate investing, and teaching others how to create financial freedom.

Charles
So why did you choose real estate as your investment vehicle?

Jorge
Yeah, great question. So as I was traveling in when I was a teenager, one of my goals and my visions in life was to be able to travel to see the world and as my relationship started to get more serious with my wife girlfriend at the time, in 2000, in like 2013-14-15, I didn’t want to continue that lifestyle where I was always away from her. And were in the future. We were planning on having kids, which now we have a 10 month young daughter. And I didn’t want to, you know, repeat that cycle where like I grew up without a father and I didn’t want to be that dad that was traveling 80% of the time, it was never home. And so I wanted to do something that I where I could create passive income and make money in my sleep, and where it would give me not just time and financial freedom, but also location freedom. The way I’ve structured my Airbnb and real estate business, it’s been exactly that we run it exactly like an online business so I could live I live in Los Angeles now, but I could live anywhere in the world, and the income would be the same.

Charles
Now you started in real estate with Airbnb investing.

Jorge
I started with long term rentals in 2012 and got into the short term rental space in 2017.

Charles
Awesome. Okay, so can you explain a little bit about the Airbnb investment model that you use and that you teach to your students?

Jorge
Yeah. So there’s three ways that you can acquire, launch and automate Airbnb’s. And that’s where you buy properties. You could also sub-lease, which is if you if I was to rent one of your properties, Charles say at $1200 a month, maybe that’s fair market rent. And if I am able to successfully generate say $2400, then I’d be in the arbitrage model so the difference would be mine. And then finally, the third option is where you can manage other people’s Airbnb s. So imagine you have an apartment unit of 10 units and three of those are an Airbnb a, you’re like a 4k. I know this is a great option, but I have so much going on, can you manage it for me, I will charge you a percentage of the gross revenue and provide a hands off experience to use it as what we call co hosting. So I have some on off three on the buy side on the assembly side and also on the CO hosting side. And my students are doing all through strategies or one of one or two other strategies well.

Charles
Awesome. So how do you locate an area or neighborhood that you’re going to target and then a specific property to list with Airbnb?

Jorge
Awesome question. There is a software called Mashvisor where we where we are able to look at what Airbnb’s are already generating in any area. So I can go in there and put, you know, Long Beach, California or Fort Lauderdale, Miami, Orlando, and it’ll tell me, hey, these properties here are generating you know, this much and this much. So if I see that there’s properties that say host between 8 to 12 people and maybe they’re three twos and you know, within 10 minutes from the beach, or 10 minutes from Disneyland and I can see you know what, I see that they’re making between four to 6000 a month, I’m able to see how much they’ve done in the last 12 months, and then say the average is four to six grand but I can see that you can rent these properties for like 18000, then I know there’s a pretty good spread. And that’s how we’re able to then find similar properties that are not yet on Airbnb. And we can launch.

Charles
Okay, so you’re researching the areas, you’re figuring out which ones perform the best. And then you you can target those areas. So what types of returns do you usually see from Airbnb? When they’re properly managed? Maybe what would be unprofitably? And then what would be a proper you know, return you would see.

Jorge
Yeah, it depends on the strategy. But one of the most popular strategy is sub-leasing. And usually in a sub-lease, you got to pay the first month a deposit, and then some furniture and decor. Hopefully, you don’t have to completely furnish the property. If you did, and you were to spend say, 10 grand to 12 grand and like furniture and things like that. You might be looking at like, depending on the area three to seven months to make all your money back and be at a breakeven point, right? And then after that, you’d be like in profit. If you go with the co-hosting route, what I really like about it is that you’re in profit, pretty much infinite return on investment. You don’t have to put any money out of pocket because you’re offering a management service. So you start cash flowing on day one.

Charles
So you’re just in the cohost model, which is something new. I’ve never even I’ve seen it before on Airbnb, but I never knew what it really meant. With the co host model, you’re really just find tuning another hosts? property, let’s say that they’ve sublease that they own whatever it might be. Now, explain that as a co host. I imagine if you’re coming as a co host, you’re a super host or something like this. So explain how I mean, how many what’s the vacancy? Or usually are you guys you know, how does that usually work your vacancy per month, and that how the super host helps you being a co host and what a super host is.

Jorge
Yeah, great question, Charles. So, for my portfolio, me and my partner, we have about 16 Airbnb right now. Combined, I own sublease and co host, most of them are on the sublease site. And we have about an 80% occupancy. Obviously, it’s dropped right now due to the corona situation that people are quarantined and whatnot. But this too will pass, we’ve been through, you know, 32 recessions before, so it’s just a matter of time. So, and then as far as super hosts, you have to have 4.8 or higher with at least 10 reservations and keeping a 98% communication score. And when you do, like when I stay at Airbnb, I only look at super host properties. I don’t even because why, why do I want to look at the properties that are 4.0 or 4.3, right? So I’m only looking at properties that average 4.8 or higher, because I know that they’re great properties and you know, otherwise they wouldn’t be super hosts. So whenever you’re a super host, you can demand higher prices. And of course that more occupancy for, you know, just having a better overall property and system going on.

Charles
When you’re doing the co host, you’re bringing the super host, you’re bringing the ability to get them to that 80% occupied level, where are you? What do you usually what do usually charge? How do you charge for this as the co host model?

Jorge
Yeah, for the for the 300 co-hosts that we have right now it’s 22% of the gross revenue. So the cleaning fee gets first passed on to us because when you look at Airbnb revenue, they put the clean and a total revenue in one basket. So we break it down and we’re like, Okay, well how much of that revenue is cleaning, that cleaning fee gets passed on to us which is a pass through expense because then it goes to our cleaning staff. And we keep about 10% of that be. The cleaning fee which is slightly marked up for replenishable is like toilet paper, paper towels, body wash afterward whatnot. And then the remaining revenue excluding the cleaning fee. We take 22% of that.

Charles
Okay, and then

Jorge
They’re pretty normal.

Charles
Okay. All right, gotcha. And then obviously, when you see the listing Airbnb clearly marked their fee in there that they’re charging as well. Is that correct?

Jorge
Yeah, it’s slightly below 3%

Charles
Okay. All right. So you touched on earlier and it’s a question that I’ve been wanting to ask you about how you and your students are reacting to COVID-19 and is that knocked out everything or is it just I mean, how does Airbnb talk to their host?

Charles
Yeah, you said how is Airbnb what

Charles
Like how your house Airbnb I heard Airbnb refund it like a ton of like everybody right? And then how are they working with you guys saying that when can you start again? mean?

Jorge
Yeah, so essentially what Airbnb as a company has done is, they’ve created like a really like a one sided structure where the guests can get an entire refund, or any bookings from like March 14 or March 14 to April 14 100%. Looks like anywhere in the world no matter what, due to the situation. However, there’s a lot of owners or people suddenly senior co-hosting mainly on the owning it suddenly it’s inside, right people still have to pay their rents and their mortgages. And so obviously that creates an issue because, you know, it’s like, how long can you sustain yourself and so what they what they should have done is some type of 50/50 structure where it’s like, Hey, your reservation was you know, $800 you’re gonna get 50 back and 50 goes to the host so they can offset their expenses that would have been like a win-win situation, but that’s not what they’ve done. So a lot of hosts, you know, are like furious right now. Especially the, you know, the host to they treat this like a job and literally, this is their paycheck. You know that that’s unfortunate. And what we’ve done to, you know, do what we cannot do what you can with what you have, where you’re at. So what we’ve done is we’ve structured myself and all my students we’ve edited like the listing titles, and we use the words like sanitized, you know, private quarantine home, things like that. And it’s helped a lot. I mean, one of my students, I’m actually going to bring him on tonight’s coaching calm to share with all the newer students how he’s done it, and he actually brought up the idea and so he’s booked from now and all of April like, like his, his mortgage will be completely paid 100% and that’s awesome. And that’s definitely not most cases for my properties that me and my partner’s, we’re probably like at a 40% occupancy right now. So it’s going to cover a lot of the payments, but we’ve been restructuring and reading agreements with the landlords are going to pay the rest at least for the month of April to create a win win because it also wouldn’t be in their best interest to try to market a property at fair market rent right now during you know the situation so we’re just creating short term solutions to be able to to move forward but you know, a lot of people are saying this should last another two to six weeks and then things will start getting back to normal and I think that as soon as things get better, Charles, people who postponed their vacations, there’s going to be like an influx of tourism and travel and air that’s when Airbnb hosts are going to make up some of what they missed out on.

Charles
Yeah, for sure. I mean, there’s it’s just it’s just right now in a pause, and that’s for everybody that’s involved with hospitality or travel. So what are some of the best ways to protect against downside risk with Airbnb ease, let’s say, in a normal environment, obviously, this is a you know, a blast. Long type episode but say for example like cities changing regulations, stuff like that, how does someone protect against if they’re going in? I mean owning it obviously co host you don’t really have too much of a risk on that I would imagine but if you’re subleasing obviously or if you’re you know obviously signing on debt you have a mortgage

Jorge
yeah one of the the number one thing is not going into an area where Airbnb’s are not allowed right and when you call the building department or whoever’s in charge in your city the three options or three answers are going to give you as one we do allow Airbnb ease you just need to get a license and then you’re good. And number two, they could say we don’t have an ordinance yet. And number three they could say we don’t allow Airbnb ease and I would say it’s almost like when you know when I invest I look at like, Okay, this is like for sure it’s almost guaranteed but it’s very conservative, not very risky. And I have like my middle bucket that is somewhat conservative, but you know, little bit, and this is like really risky, right? except on the Airbnb side, I would not go on that third bucket. And I would focus more on the middle two with primarily only launching Airbnb in areas where there is an ordinance and where they are allowed. And there’s a ton of them. And so that that would be the first thing because you don’t you wouldn’t you you want to build a sustainable and scalable business. But if you don’t if if you’re going to be subject to ordinances that that makes it really risky.

Charles
So when you’re doing a lease or sublease, because obviously this is not going to be a normal lease, typical lease that you’re going to get from a landlord because in every landlord lease I’ve seen for 12 month lease, it’s has something in there about not allowing subleasing. So explain the agreement and explain if you have some sort of backdoor in there. If the if there’s a government regulation that changes.

Jorge
Yeah, great question. So we are very transparent with the landlords from the very beginning. We let them know that we are You know, a short term rental vacation and corporate housing company. And there’s a lot of things that we do to make sure that we run a smooth operation. So we have like noise sensors inside the property, external cameras, a quiet policy from 10pm to 8am. You know, maximum two to three cars to be able to park, a strict no party, no event policy, we collect a deposit from each guest. Usually when people try to throw a party, it’s always locals. So you’re not going to have somebody from Australia come to Los Angeles to throw a party, right? It’s usually local. So if it’s a local, you’re like, why are they trying to book in LA if you’re from LA, and you can start digging and finding now and like letting them know, you know, just reminding them. And so we do a lot of things like that, that we talked about in the initial conversation to help create, you know, peace of mind, and that definitely helps. And as far as the back door, I mean, we don’t we don’t I mean, the only backdoor is that if there was to change an ordinance like say they allowed Airbnb and all of a sudden they changed it, then the best case scenario at that point is to put a long term tenant for the remainder of the lease, break even collect your deposit and then move on to the next one. Obviously, right now like we said, this is the Black Swan so we’ve been talking to the landlords and just creating short term solutions for the time being

Charles
Yeah, that’s a great it’s a great way of doing it or also just going to the landlord and saying, hey, if I rent this out to a good tenant, you know we part ways and you’re transferring the least to this this this party. That’s awesome. That’s a great way of doing it. I wasn’t thinking that the so I hear you speaking on it like in your talk about the your talk about the party thing, which is kind of cool cuz I was on your, your Facebook group. And you have, you’re talking about some sort of piece of technology is an app that can tell you how many people are at your property is that What is that? What is that?

Charles
It’s very interesting. I don’t know about it. But I have a student that is super, like he goes into all the detail all the analytics, like he thinks like an engineer, and just a really smart guy. And he actually is the one that told the rest of our students about it. And I honestly don’t even know enough about it to share. But I just know that with this app, you’re able to detect, like how many cell phones are connected to the Wi Fi, or something along those lines, and they will tell you how many people are there. Which is pretty awesome. But yeah,

Charles
Yeah, that’s crazy. That’s interesting. All these different. You don’t really notice when you’re renting an Airbnb, but then you kind of have an idea. I imagine if you got a textbook just Hey, you guys have so many people at the house or something like this, I imagine for location sensors or whatever it might be but so with your with your teaching with your mentoring, you talk a lot about working on your business versus working in your business. So what activities should BMP investors be focusing on to be working on the business rather than in the business all the time.

Jorge
Yeah, great question. So the three main operations when running an Airbnb is cleaning, maintenance and communication, they’re going to be ongoing. And it’s like the three essential part of running a successful business. And there’s a lot of Airbnb hosts and people that do this in other businesses. But if you’re doing communication, and you’re also cleaning the property, and you’re also doing maintenance on the property, because you’re working in the business, you don’t really have time or see the vision and value of getting another one. Or if you do, you’re kind of like, oh, man, I can only clean two a day. So I’m pretty tapped out. And now you’re running your business like a job. So the book II myth, revised by Michael eager Gerber, he talks about the three levels of entrepreneurship. There’s a technician, manager, and entrepreneur, technician, manager entrepreneur, so they’re taking All they care about is what do I do? And how do I do it, they’re just doing doing doing. They’re that solopreneur that wears the hat. They’re all the hats in the business. They do marketing, sales, client delivery, customer service, like everything. And they’re very much in the business. And they don’t, you know, they because they run their business like a job, they can’t, you know, they’re thinking of going to Hawaii for a week. They’re like, I’m gonna stop making income because if I stopped, the business stops, too. They’re shrinking their hours for dollars, no leverage. And then the next level is where you become like the manager and now you hire out those three positions. You know, you hired three technicians. So now you can be more implemented like business structure, more systems, and now you’re communicating with each technician on the cleaning, the maintenance and the communication. And then of course, you know, you could start growing and focusing more on acquisitions on more on like income producing activities focusing on like the 80/20 rule. You focus on acquisitions implement the system. And then the highest level is the entrepreneur and that’s the visionary your work, you’re no longer working in the business, you’re working on the business. Now you hire, you know, maybe you hire three managers, and each manager oversees five properties. And now you got 15, Airbnb ease, you communicate with your managers, then they communicate with all the technicians below. And you could focus on, again, the 20% of activities that generate 80% of the results. So as an entrepreneur and a visionary, we’ve hired a manager that oversees our portfolio and communicates directly with the entire team. So if you want to truly grow and scale, not just an Airbnb business, but any business, you got to start thinking like a visionary. And you got to start delegating and building a team and systems and asset protection. So this way, if you go on vacation for seven days, you make the same amount of money, as if you were back home.

Charles
Yeah, you’re getting it. You’re You’re outsourcing a lot Have those low value lifetime value tasks off your plate? And, and yeah, actually running it like a business. So, well how does someone go about systemising? Or automating their Airbnb business? What are some of the first steps that you suggest someone to to take?

Jorge
Yeah, so one of those things is hiring a cleaning person. Obviously, when you interview them, you want to make sure that you delegate everything that involves any in person stuff, obviously cleaning taking out the trash replenishable. So, you know, like keeping track of toilet paper paper towels and, you know, once a month, go to Costco and then have like a storage to keep track of that if the guests are requesting more blankets or a fan or a heater, you know, to be accessible. So ideally, you want to hire a cleaning person that lives with as close as possible to the property, hopefully no more than 15 minutes. You want to make sure that you add them as a co host to the Airbnb. be this way they have access to the calendar. And you don’t have to be communicating when to clean. The other thing is you can hire virtual assistants like in the Philippines on a website called onlinejobs.ph. And for 20 bucks a month, you can have someone do all the communications for your property, you want to create like a Google Doc with all the FAQ s and then you want to build onto that document. As more questions come up until your virtual assistant knows your property inside and out. And then for maintenance, you again want to hire like a local handyman that could be on common available. And ideally, your cleaning crew should communicate directly with them. So like one time, I think this was the first time and this is me just educating my cleaning crew. I got a call saying hey, it looks like there’s a plumbing issue and I said, Great who’s going to fix it? You know, like instead of coming to me with a problem, come to me with a solution and just teach To be like managers, and operators and come with, come come to me with three solutions before you call me type of thing. And they already know and just pick, you know, staying on top of it, because these things have to be handled with urgency. And if I’m away from my phone and gets checked out at 10 new guests come at three, you waited, you know, so just training them also building that trust. And yeah, let me know if I answered that correctly.

Charles
Yeah, for sure. It’s really putting a putting a team in place. And it’s great that FAQ with a VA is a fantastic which you could use for any type of business. That’s a great way of taking so much off your plate because a lot of that stuff is just copy and paste the same questions all day long. And even if you have an FAQ page they’re not going to read it. Obviously there’s not one on Airbnb, but so it’s easy to have someone there doing that. And then all as Yeah, the handyman because I’ve seen it before they have someone coming in like five or six hours and they have to have that the plumbing issue. rectified before they come in, and it’s kind of you want your team to call you and say, Hey, new persons in there. Now, this is what we just did in the last four hours. And kind of, you’re just getting a bill in your email or in your mail. So you mentor, obviously, a lot of new investors, what mistakes you commonly see new investors make.

Charles
One of the mistakes that people will make is they see asking for help and asking for support as a weakness rather than a strength. So good example is they they’re setting up the Airbnb, right, whether it’s something buying something the senior co hosting site, and they have like two people setting up the entire property, that and it’s going to take them like 10 days because it’s so much work. And so I always tell my students in the beginning, like, hey, how, you know, ask each other a lot of my students that live in the same cities will come out and support each other. It’s also part of like a learning experience and then, you know, they support The newbies and and then once they become more experienced, they support the newbies and it’s just like a great ecosystem. And so I always say make sure you have a as many people as possible. Like I, when I launched, like my first four, I would have like pizza parties and I would go on social media, hey, who wants to learn and just get some hands on experience and you’re going to get some free pizza, and I’d get 678 people, you know, nine people setting up and we’d be done in like two days. So I would say that’s definitely a big one right there. Another one is just make sure that you know you don’t over leverage yourself. So you don’t want to be doing the communication for like five or six Airbnb. So I would say after you have to, for the third one and moving forward, you want to really start delegating those communications because you actually lose money. If you don’t, those are like two to $3 activities. And you should focus on how your income producing activities and so this is Where figuring out how much your hours worth is a great strategy. So if you take your desired income and divide it by 2000, you’re going to get your desired hourly. So $100,000 a year divided by 2000 is $50 an hour. And if you’re someone that’s making 60 bucks in that 60,000 a year, and you want to get to 100K a year, you should not do anything that is less than $50, or maybe $30. And below, so don’t mow your lawn, don’t do your laundry. Don’t wash your car, like all these things. You can delegate for 10 to $25 an hour, and you should be focusing on those $15 an hour activities.

Charles
Yeah, it’s amazing how many things that you can take off your plate with just a virtual assistant, and they don’t even need like a huge time requirement. You can start them off we have some that we started off and we just say, Hey, we’re starting off at $5 or five hours a week, right? And then we kind of we just add more stuff on and add more stuff on after they start working with you. It’s great in the beginning, you do have to, that’s a good thing about when you’re systemising to, to know everything that you’re doing in the process for everything you’re trying to, at some point, take off your plate, then you can just kind of send that over to them and they have an idea they have a plan for what, what’s going on. And then also, you know, when you properly spend the time, the hours it takes to get someone to where you want them as a VA and to take over your role fully. It takes many hours, I think people underestimate that they just hire them and say, Okay, I’m going on vacation, which you’ve got to really now start now the work starts for the next maybe month, two months until it gets to where you want but in in month three when it comes around you’re going to be very happy that you you did those those steps but so how is becoming a mentor played a role in your growth in business and personally?

Jorge
You know, I look back in mentors have changed my life when I you know, ever since I was like 12 years old and my dad passed away from alcohol. Attracted my first mentor into my life. And I remember he sat with me, it was my seventh grade substitute teacher, Mr. Purcell. And you know, being in person in his 30s and me being 12 years old, obviously having a lot of life experience. He said to me that I didn’t have to repeat the patterns. And I didn’t have to be a product of my environment, that I could set a new standard for my younger, younger siblings, and that I could change the world. And so learning from someone else who had a great life and, or someone that just has the result and outcome that I desire, basically, what I’m doing is paying for speed. Like Yeah, I could just go through the YouTube videos and the books and you know, but, you know, it might take me five to 10 times longer. And so throughout my life, I’ve always had mentors. I have multiple mentors now. And anytime I’ve wanted to get into a new industry or something new that I didn’t have mastered. I’ve always asked myself one question, Who is the very best at that? Already, how can I work with them to help me go further, bigger, faster and stronger. And so essentially, that’s what I’ve done. You know, being 12 years of full time business owner and building multiple, seven figure businesses, there’s so much that I’ve learned over the years. And so when someone is coming in, and it’s their first time starting a business, being an Airbnb, there’s so much that I can help them do and to, you know, to really kickstart their journey. And I see it two ways, right, you either make the investment in the front end, or you pay the price in the back end, and the price is a lot more expensive, because you got to reinvent the wheel go through all the mistakes. And if you have that mindset of like, Oh, I think I could do it on my own. And, and I’ll just do it on my own. It’s just gonna take a long time and that’s okay for some people. I like to create bigger, faster results anytime I can. And so, so aside from that, I also didn’t notice even Like, multiple x, more of success in my life when I went from focusing on myself, and I started focusing on other people, it’s like the universe just started blessing me and saying, Wow, and that’s, that’s what I see as, you know, if I was to create just success for myself, it’s like, I don’t know, what’s the point of that. And so the idea here is how can I share the golden nuggets? How can I share that learning curve, and share it with someone else, so that they don’t have to go through what I went through, and they can also create freedom for their family. So for me, a big part of my life is being in contribution and making a difference.

Charles
Yeah, you went from trying to make money and starting a business and then you realize and discover a whole new purpose in your life they didn’t even know existed. And that’s, you know, helping people find, you know, come to where you are.

Jorge
Yeah, and I’ll tell you, it was very clear to me in like, 2017 we created some content Some massive goals that we had financially, and I’m broke came home and me and my wife celebrated, we went out to eat. And then three days later, I just felt like empty. I was just like, Hmm, I don’t feel like a million bucks, you know. And that’s what I realized is that I was just focusing on myself. And that’s when it just became super apparent to me that I should share what I’ve learned with other people. And that makes me feel like a million bucks just being in contribution and making a difference like seeing some of my students, that they actually now are able to spend time with their kids with your spouse and, and just seeing their growth. man that’s just priceless.

Charles
Yeah, no, I definitely I agree. And how can people learn more about you and your business? And then any kind of links I’ll put into the show notes.

Charles
Yeah, the best way would be on Instagram, thejorgecontreras. I will be launching my personal brand website that for people data.com and a few weeks, but Instagram for now would be the way, the best way. And my email also [email protected]

Charles
Awesome, Jorge. Well, thank you so much for being on the show today. And looking forward to linking up with you in the future.

Jorge
Thank you, man. I appreciate your time. Charles

Charles
Talk to you soon.

Jorge
Okay.

Charles
Hi guys, this is Charles from the Global Investors Podcast. I hope you enjoyed the show. If you’re interested in investing in real estate and you don’t know where to begin, set up a free 15 minute strategy call with me at schedulecharles.com. That’s schedulecharles.com.

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Nothing in this episode should be considered specific, personal or professional advice. Any investment opportunities mentioned on this podcast are limited to accredited investors. Any investments will only be made with proper disclosure, subscription documentation, and are subject to all applicable laws. Please consult an appropriate tax legal, real estate, financial or business professional for individualized advice. Opinions of guests are their own information is not guaranteed. All investment strategies have the potential for profit or loss. The host is operating on behalf of harborside partners incorporated exclusively.

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About Jorge Contreras

Jorge Contreras is an Airbnb Expert and Real Estate Investor. He is passionate about helping others live their best life by mastering financial literacy and emotional intelligence.

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